A Close-Up Shot on Native American Women in Film

Series includes interviews with artists and filmmakers.

By EGP News Services

A special two-part series that shows the portrayals of Native Americans in contemporary film will take place Jan 24 and Feb 21 at 2 p.m. at the Autry National Center in association with the UCLA Film and Television Archive and with special support provided by the Academy of Motion Picture Arts and Sciences.  The event is free with museum admission.

From the 2007 film “Older Than America,” directed by Georgina Lightning (Cree). The feature explores a dark reality that has shaped generations of Native American experience cross the U.S. and Canada—the Indian boarding school. A woman’s haunting visions reveal a web of intrigue that reaches out from the past in a cry for justice and healing. (Courtesy of Tribal Alliance)

From the 2007 film “Older Than America,” directed by Georgina Lightning (Cree). The feature explores a dark reality that has shaped generations of Native American experience cross the U.S. and Canada—the Indian boarding school. A woman’s haunting visions reveal a web of intrigue that reaches out from the past in a cry for justice and healing. (Courtesy of Tribal Alliance)

Screenings of shorts and feature films will include a discussion with Georgina Lightning (Cree) who directed “Older than America,” a contemporary drama filled with suspense about Indian boarding schools and filmed on the Fond du Lac reservation in northern Minnesota, on Sunday, Jan 24.

Speaking on Sunday, Feb 21 is Irene Bedard (Inupiat Eskimo/Cree) who was an actor in “Edge of America” in 2003. The film is inspired by a true story about an African American school teacher and basketball coach who moves from his hometown in Texas to the Three Nations Reservation in Utah. There he struggles getting the women’s basketball team back in shape.

These women will discuss the obstacles that Native American women have when working in the film industry as well as the opportunities they have established for emerging Native American filmmakers.

This series is tied to the Autry National Center’s upcoming exhibition, Home Lands: How Women Made the West that opens in April.

For more information, visit the Autry National Center website.

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January 14, 2010  Copyright © 2012 Eastern Group Publications, Inc.

Comments

One Response to “A Close-Up Shot on Native American Women in Film”

  1. Richard on January 15th, 2010 7:54 am

    Its bad enough that our relatives were placed in boarding schools. We have all heard the stories that the older ones told.
    What makes it worse is that many of these same relatives who went to these schools were then enlisted into the armed forces of this country some even before they were citizens.
    The armed forcse was not a bad place to be. Fighting for what they believed in was a good thing. What was wrong was that Native Americans were exempt by law (SSCRA of 1940)from having their military wages taxed. However and even though this was a federal law to protect the military wages of everyone, the taxes were deducted from the Indians income by the states and this was illegal.
    The warriors that you are so proud of and eager to shake hands with have all been cheated and had military wages stolen from them. Doesnt this make you mad?

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