Let the Fiestas Begin! ¡Que Viva East Los Ángeles! Hispanic Heritage Month Kicks Off

Culture, Tradition On Display In East L.A.

By EGP Staff Report

(Pictured clockwise) 1.Riding on a parade float, actors reenacted the cry for battle that initiated the Mexican war for independence. 2.Several groups of horsemen rode down E. Cesar E. Chavez Avenue including men dressed in Mexican civil war costumes. 3.Los Angeles Councilman Jose Huizar dressed as a charro. 4.Aztec dancers presented the pre-Hispanic indigenous culture of Mexico in the parade. 5.Local students and dancers held their heads high performing for the crowds gathered for the only annual parade in East L.A. (EGP photos by Gloria Angelina Castillo and Fred Zermeno)

(Pictured clockwise) 1.Riding on a parade float, actors reenacted the cry for battle that initiated the Mexican war for independence. 2.Several groups of horsemen rode down E. Cesar E. Chavez Avenue including men dressed in Mexican civil war costumes. 3.Los Angeles Councilman Jose Huizar dressed as a charro. 4.Aztec dancers presented the pre-Hispanic indigenous culture of Mexico in the parade. 5.Local students and dancers held their heads high performing for the crowds gathered for the only annual parade in East L.A. (EGP photos by Gloria Angelina Castillo and Fred Zermeno)

 

Blazing heat could not squelch the enthusiasm of thousands of spectators who turned out Sunday to watch the 67th Annual Mexican Independence Day as it traveled down Cesar Chavez Avenue in East L.A, though many did seek refuge from the heat under an umbrella or canopy, or a shady area along the parade route.

Cheers and applause filled the air as colorfully dressed dancers swirled their skirts and tapped their feet to lively music with origins from the different regions of Mexico, also represented by beauty queens who smiled and waved at onlookers from one of the many parade floats or cars. Gleaming horses, ridden by charros (Mexican horsemen), pranced down the parade route, followed by drum regiments, cheer squads, classic cars ferrying elected officials and civic leaders down Cesar Chavez.

The parade commemorates Mexico’s cry for independence from Spain on Sept. 16, 1810, and marks the start of Hispanic Heritage Month in the U.S., which annually runs from Sept. 15-Oct. 15. The month long observance, started each year with a Presidential Proclamation, aims to highlight the culture, history, talent and contributions of people of Hispanic Heritage, which are deeply woven into the fabric of America.

The parade was organized by the Comité Mexicano Cívico Patriótico.

 

 

Print This Post Print This Post

September 12, 2013  Copyright © 2012 Eastern Group Publications, Inc.

Comments

Comments are intended to further discussion on the article topic. EGPNews reserves the right to not publish, edit or remove comments that contain vulgarities, foul language, personal attacks, racists, sexist, homophobic or other offensive terminology or that contain solicitations, spam, or that threaten harm of any sort. EGPNews will not approve comments that call for or applaud the death, injury or illness of any person, regardless of their public status. Questions regarding this policy should be e-mailed to service@egpnews.com.





 characters available

Copyright © 2014 Eastern Group Publications, Inc. · Log in