Debate Gets Heated As Supervisors Consider Clampdown on Illegal Street Vending

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Illegal sidewalk vendors in the Florence-Firestone area drew attention at a Los Angeles County Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday.

Hundreds of vendors, selling everything from fruit cocktail to cell phones, are a health and safety hazard, residents and small business owners told the Board of Supervisors. Some community advocates said the vendors were struggling entrepreneurs, creating their own jobs to pay their rent and support their families in an era of high unemployment.

“Street vending is a symptom of macroeconomic issues,” said Rudy Espinoza, Executive Director of Leadership for Urban Renewal Now. “A lot of the vendors are older and chronically unemployed,” Espinoza said, “and ultimately decide, ‘Hey, I need to create my own job … to pay my bills and take care of my family.”’

Owners paying rent for storefronts along the roughly three-quarter mile stretch of Compton Avenue between 60th Street and Slauson Avenue say they may lose their own livelihoods if street vending isn’t better regulated.

“It’s overwhelming, the amount of vendors that are on the street,” Antonio Moreno, a small business owner who claims to be representing more than 40 businesses in the area, told the board through a translator. “At this point, I’m in danger of closing my business.”

Walnut Park resident Efren Martinez said that some business owners had been threatened by vendors to stop hassling those on the street and “get back into their business or else they will come back to ashes.”

Residents said they are also worried about health hazards posed by vendors who cook and handle food without access to clean water. Vendors sell meat, milk, eggs, fruit and cheese, sometimes setting up chairs to create makeshift restaurants, while others hawk hard goods like clothing and electronics, undercutting the prices of local business owners.

Advocates for the vendors say they also want to see healthy food offered, but argue that street vendors provide a valuable service to communities that suffer from a dearth of grocery stores and make the streets safer at night, when other businesses shut down.

Illegal street vending is an issue being looked at by several local cities, including Los Angeles where advocates have been working with some members of the city council to change regulations, adopt vending zones and to allow vendors to purchase special vending licenses. Opposition from businesses and residents, however, still runs high in some areas.

The debate Tuesday was prompted by Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas’ recommendation that the county look at strengthening ordinances to better regulate illegal vending and what he called “extended yard sales” that amount to flea markets.

Ridley-Thomas didn’t outline a specific proposal, but Capt. Joseph Gooden of the Los Angeles County sheriff’s Century Station said the Sheriff’s Department was already working with the Department of Public Health, the District Attorney’s Office and others to try to find a solution to what he called a systemic problem.

“We needed to have more bite from a county ordinance,” Gooden said, “something that would give my deputies the ability to enforce this.”

Under current regulations, deputies must rely on public health officials, who aren’t available around the clock, to inspect and police vendors, Gooden said. He would like deputies to have the authority to independently issue citations and seize equipment put to illegal use.

A lack of law enforcement resources is also an issue. Funding for a team of five deputies that focused on quality of life issues like illegal vending and prostitution was cut almost a year ago, Gooden said.

But even when his deputies are able to conduct sweeps of the area with public health officials – now usually once a quarter – and shut down individual vendors, “someone else takes up that space,” Gooden said. He said there is a larger organization behind the individual carts and stalls that line Compton Avenue. A resident who has registered numerous complaints with the county agrees.

“It’s sophisticated,” said resident Mark Walker. “They’ve got distribution, transportation, advertising.” They pick up and drop off equipment to vendors at large public spaces like hospitals and banks and supply vendors with food, Walker said. “They’re not naive.”

Supervisor Michael Antonovich suggested that any new ordinance might differ across communities. “Not all county unincorporated areas experience the same issues,” Antonovich said, asking those working on the problem to be sensitive to the unique concerns of individual communities. He used parking regulations as an example of a county ordinance tailored to suit differing needs.

The board directed staffers to draft an ordinance and set a public hearing on the matter.

50,000 New Toys Donated to SoCal Foster Youth

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Abused and neglected children in Southern California’s foster care system indirectly received a gift last Friday when over 125 volunteers got together to sort and package 50,000 brand new toys donated by the Toy Industry Foundation.

“Play Your Part” volunteers helped package toys destined for children in the foster care system. (Photo courtesy of Denise Malone)

The Toy Industry Foundation and National CASA (Court Appointed Special Advocates) Association partnered for the April 5th “Play Your Part” volunteer event held at a World Vision center on South Garfield Avenue in the City of Commerce.

“Today’s event was a fantastic success and the impact these toys will have on the lives of foster children throughout California is indescribable,” said National CASA CEO Michael Piraino, in a written statement. “We want to thank all of the organizations whose partnership made this possible.”

“The partnership we have forged with National CASA is one that will continue to grow, through events like this one today and via collaborations on an even grander scale in the future,” Toy Industry Foundation Executive Director Jean Butler, in a written statement. “It was a wonderful day, and our foundation couldn’t be happier to help reach so many children.”

Toy Industry Foundation supporters include Mattel, Leapfrog Enterprises, Funrise Toy Corporation, and Women in Toys. Wal-mart also supported the event by donating the use of two tractor-trailer trucks to ship the toys to destinations throughout Southern California.

Sobriety Checkpoint in Eagle Rock Friday

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

The Los Angeles Police Department will conduct sobriety and driver license checkpoints and beef-up anti-driving under the influence patrols in Hollywood, Hyde Park, Eagle Rock and South Los Angeles from Friday night to midnight Saturday.

A saturation patrol will be deployed in Hollywood from 6 p.m. Friday to 2 a.m. Saturday, the department announced Tuesday.

Checkpoints will be operated between 8 p.m. Friday and 2 a.m. Saturday on Slauson Avenue at Buckler Avenue in Hyde Park and on Eagle Rock Boulevard at El Paso Drive in Eagle Rock, police said.

A checkpoint will also be operated from 6 p.m. to midnight Saturday on Manchester Avenue at Hoover Street in South Los Angeles Crashes involving alcohol drop by an average of 20 percent when well-publicized checkpoints are conducted often enough, according to the LAPD.

Bus Hits Car, Sends 7 to Hospital

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

A wreck in Monterey Hills sent six special-needs passengers and their driver to a hospital to be checked out yesterday.

A vehicle described as a small bus struck a parked vehicle about 8 a.m. in the 4200 block of Monterey Road, Brian Humphrey of the Los Angeles Fire Department said.

Six young people and the bus driver were taken to a hospital, he said.

No additional information was available by press time.

High School Graduation Rate Up In County

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

The high school graduation rate in Los Angeles County for the 2011-12 school year was 74.7 percent, with a dropout rate of 14.9 percent, according to figures released Tuesday by the state Department of Education.

The graduation rate was up from 73.7 percent from the previous year, while the dropout rate dipped from 16.7 percent, according to the state.

The graduation and dropout rates were for students who entered the ninth grade in 2008-09. Those who didn’t graduate with their class or leave school altogether either remained enrolled, completed special education programs or passed the General Educational Development (GED) test.

The upticks reflected statewide gains. According to the CDE, 78.5 percent of Californians graduated with their class last year, up 1.4 percent from the previous year. Black and Hispanic students also posted gains of about a couple of percentage points each.

“There are great things happening in California’s schools every day, and the upward climb of our graduation rate bears that out,” according to Tom Torlakson, the state superintendent of public instruction. “While I am glad to announce that we are moving in the right direction, the fact remains that we must keep moving to ensure that every California student graduates ready to succeed in the world they will find outside our classrooms.”

The statewide dropout rate declined 1.5 percent to 13.2 percent.

In the Los Angeles Unified School District – the nation’s second largest, 66.2 percent of students who entered high school in 2008-09 graduated with their class in 2012, up from 64.8 percent the prior year. The dropout rate in LAUSD was 20.3 percent, down from 22.6 percent, according to the state.

In LAUSD, the graduation rate for white students was 70.7 percent, with a dropout rate of 21.1 percent, according to the CDE statistics. For Hispanics, the rates were 65.5 percent and 20.1 percent; for black students 60.6 percent and 24.7 percent; and for Asians, 85.2 percent and 9 percent.

In the Montebello Unified School District, the graduation rate was 78.4 percent for students who entered high school in 2008-09 and graduated with their class in 2012. The dropout rate for MUSD was 14.4 percent for this cohort.

The graduation rate for white students in MUSD was 88.1 percent, with a dropout rate of 8.5 percent, according to the CDE statistics. For Hispanics, the rates were 77.5 percent and 14.4 percent; for Asians, 97.2 percent and 2.8 percent, and the percentages for black students were not calculated because there were 10 or fewer students in the cohort, according to the CDE statistics.

Editorial Cartoon

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Violent Crime Down So Far in City of L.A.

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Crime in Los Angeles dropped in the first three months of this year – with violent crimes dropping by half over the past eight years, top city officials said on April 5.

The new statistics follow a trend that Police Chief Charlie Beck and departing Mayor Antonio Villaraigosa attribute to the increased number of police officers since 2005 and an emphasis on community policing and gang prevention programs.

“(The) crime rate is at a record low because the police force is at a record high,” said Villaraigosa, who joined Beck at a news conference to announce 2013’s first-quarter crime rate figures.

The numbers released on April 5 also compared the first quarter of this year to a three-month period just prior to when Villaraigosa first took office in July 2005, with Beck underscoring the mayor’s role in reducing the crime rate in Los Angeles.

“This is a mayor whose commitment to public safety, whose vision created the GRYD (Gang Reduction and Youth Development) office, whose understanding of the world, of Los Angeles, has cut violent crime, gang crime and homicides in half since he became mayor,” Beck said.

In the most dramatic figure, gang-related homicides took a 66.7 percent dive over the past eight years since Villaraigosa took office, a sign of progress Beck attributed to the “recognition that violence in Los Angeles is gang violence, which is why we focus on gang crime so heavily.”

Villaraigosa also touted the dramatic reduction in gang-related crimes as a achievement of his time in office, with the new numbers showing gang-related crimes in general took a 55.3 percent dip since 2005. Citywide violent and property crimes dropped 33.9 percent in that same period.

After voters rejected Proposition A – a ballot measure that would have raised the sales tax by a half-cent – in the March 5 primary election, city leaders warned the police department could be among the target for cuts as city leaders look for ways to solve a $150 million to $165 million budget deficit.

But while Villaraigosa said the police department would not be treated as a “sacred cow,” he nevertheless urged Eric Garcetti and Wendy Greuel – the mayoral candidates vying to succeed him – to commit to maintaining police ranks at 10,000 officers or more.

“If you want to be the mayor of Los Angeles, then you’re going to have to continue to hire police at the levels that we have,” said Villaraigosa, who will leave office at the end of June. “You’re going to have to continue to make sure public safety is our number one priority.”

In 2005, police officers numbered 9,284, and today, there are just over 10,000 police officers, according to department statistics.

Villaraigosa – who promised to increase the police force in 2005 – said he is “proud to have achieved that milestone” and that his budget, to be released later this month, will recommend continuing to hire police.

“I expect that the next mayor will have the same commitment,” he said. “I’ve had assurances from both candidates that they will, and I hope to hear them speak to that in the course of this campaign.”

The first three months of the year displayed a 7.9 percent drop in both violent and property crimes, with numbers showing declines in all categories. The crime rate in all geographic areas covered by each of the department’s bureaus also fell.

The first quarter saw 66 homicides, a 12 percent decrease from last year. Of those killed, 29 people were killed in gang-related situations, a 29.3 percent drop from last year’s number.

When this quarter’s total homicides are compared with 131 homicides in 2005, the homicide rate in Los Angeles declined by 49.6 percent, or nearly half, over the past eight years.

Beck framed the drop as an “additional 300 people” who are alive and walking the “streets of Los Angeles every year.”

Rapes, which saw an uptick last year, came down by 39.4 percent to 124 cases, while aggravated assaults dipped by 11.3 percent and robberies by 13.2 percent.

The department responded to 19,826 property crimes in the first quarter, which represents a 6.8 percent dip from last year. Reports of shots fired declined by 13.6 percent, and the number of shooting victims was 9.3 percent less during the first three months.

The numbers were released for a three-month period in which the police department collaborated on a massive manhunt of an ex-LAPD officer that targeted and killed law enforcement and their family members.

Eastside LGBT Forum Calls for ‘Respect’, Instead of ‘Tolerance’

April 11, 2013 by · 1 Comment 

“Sometimes people reject us, they see us as monsters. We are not monsters,” said 25-year-old José Hernandez last Saturday during the LGBTQ Forum for Youth, Families and Community Services held at Mariachi Plaza in the predominately Latino community of Boyle Heights.

Being a transgender youth in Mexico was a struggle, Hernandez said. Not having any support from his family, he wound up depressed and homeless, and nearly died after suddenly stopping the hormone therapy that would have allowed him to live as a woman, the Boyle Heights resident and Garfield Adult School student told EGP.

Lea esta nota EN ESPAÑOL: Foro LGBT Envía Mensaje por ‘Respeto,’ en vez de ‘Tolerancia’

While his story was not part of the formal program or spoken from the stage, Hernandez’ experience is not untypical of the experiences Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) youth experience everyday in the eastside community and all across the country.

Around 100 LGBT supporters gathered at Mariachi Plaza on April 6 for the first ever openly gay forum in a public space in Boyle Heights. (EGP photo by Gloria Angelina Castillo)

The April 6 forum, held in a very public place, was intended to empower LGBTQ people of color – people like José Hernandez – and to expose and educate Boyle Height’s large immigrant population to LGBTQ issues.

It was also about respect and shedding the notions of acceptance from the past.

Stop being “decorative gays,” challenged Queen Victoria Elizabeth Ortega, a poised 33-year-old transgender Boyle Heights resident and LGBTQ activist dressed in a business suit and pumps and speaking from the stage at Mariachi Plaza.

“Lets challenge our service organizations, lets challenge our families… we have to do it with respeto (respect)…” to lessen the suffering caused by discrimination, especially among the youth, Ortega urged the more than 100 people in attendance.

During the opening ceremony, speakers addressed the serious issues of bullying, suicide, discrimination and being forced to live as outcasts due to sexual orientation. Participants were encouraged to become agents of change and to raise the discourse bar from putting up with being “tolerated” to receiving “respect”.

“Today inspires the vision, a heartfelt hope that I and all the other LGBT members and people like me will be able to walk to dinner in Boyle Heights or any community in which we live, holding the hand of our wife or husband, accompanied by our children and to feel safe and be an integral part of our community… We hope you can share this vision with us,” said Ari Gutierrez, chairwoman of the Latino Equality Alliance, an organization established in response to Proposition 8, which is now under review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Gutierrez said the forum was the first time an openly gay event has been held in Boyle Heights and it was the first time the community had been brought together to talk about the safety and health of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Queer identifying youth.

“Its the first time we can stand in our community, in a public plaza and say to the world that tolerance is not enough,” she said. “When it comes to discussing LGBT issues with our families and our friends, love, compassion, communication and understanding of our shared values are key to a whole and well society.”

Growing up, Queen Victoria Elizabeth Ortega lived in the Wyvernwood apartments. She told the audience that she’s been discriminated against and harassed, and regularly called names when she jogs around the Evergreen Cemetery jogging path.

“We need to claim our space, we need to make this happen for ourselves,” Ortega said.

Born the only ‘male’ child in her family, she felt pressured to carry on the family’s name and “seed”.

It took about six years and her mother’s death to get where she is today, and to have her father’s support.

“[My mother’s passing] allowed me and my father to have that uncomfortable silence that is needed; there will be uncomfortable silence today… I challenge you to work through it, that is what this space is needed for,” Ortega said.

Her father, 71-year-old Adrian, said he was immediately ostracized by family and friends when he began to support his daughter, but he could not turn his back on his “Vicky Lou” (his pet name for his daughter), he told EGP.

The pressure and humiliation can take its toll on families but its harder on the youth.

According to the event organizers, LGBTQ youth, especially minorities, face issues of bullying at home, in school and in the community which often leads to family separation, homelessness, high-risk health behavior that can expose them to HIV/AIDS and an early death. In addition, LGBT students are 1.4 times more likely to be suspended than their straight peers, organizers said.

White House LGBTQ Liaison, Gautam Raghavan, said that many victims of hate crimes nationwide are disproportionately minority, LGBT people. He said the Obama Administration has adopted policy changes to help protect and ensure equitable treatment for LGBT persons.

“I hope that if you take something with you from me being here today, I hope its the knowledge that the President of the United States, The White House and the entire administration are with you every step of the way,” he said, encouraging attendees to be advocates for LGBT equality.

The time has come to evolve beyond just being tolerated, according to LAPD Assistant Chief Sandy Jo MacArthur. While the LAPD and society have made some advances since she joined the police department in 1980, MacArthur said being “tolerant” of LGBTQ persons is not enough.

“I was tolerated, it didn’t feel very good. I think everyone out there has been tolerated at some time. Tolerance stinks. It was really a bad concept from the start but people thought it was [at least] a start. I’m here to tell you that what we need to look forward and strive for is respect. Tolerance is just not cutting it, and respect is where we need to be.”

MacArthur said it is very important for the LAPD to respect everyone, regardless of where you’re from, who you love or what country you come from.

“Change is about education. One of the best way to bring about change is to talk about the stories, how each one of you has been impacted by things in society that are just not right,” she said.

When Univision Reporter Norma Roque’s brother came out of the closet, most of her family still embraced him, she told the audience in Spanish.

But that’s not the norm.

“We need to stop the jokes [about LGBTQ people], she said. “That’s everyone’s task… if you hear someone joke, speak up, say ‘that [joke] is not acceptable.’”

What will the LGBTQ community’s narrative be in the future, questioned Diego Sepulveda, a queer undocumented youth from South Los Angeles.

“A time of change is coming and it’s in the making, and it’s up to us to take our rightful place in it. So I encourage you to be an advocate for the LGBT community and everyone who wishes to have a place in society and they should.”

For more information, visit www.calendow.org or www.latinoequalityalliance.com

“Sometimes people reject us, they see us as monsters. We are not monsters,” said 25-year-old José Hernandez last Saturday during the LGBTQ Forum for Youth, Families and Community Services held at Mariachi Plaza in the predominately Latino community of Boyle Heights.

Being a transgender youth in Mexico was a struggle, Hernandez said. Not having any support from his family, he wound up depressed and homeless, and nearly died after suddenly stopping the hormone therapy that would have allowed him to live as a woman, the Boyle Heights resident and Garfield Adult School student told EGP.

While his story was not part of the formal program or spoken from the stage, Hernandez’ experience is not untypical of the experiences Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender and Queer (LGBTQ) youth experience everyday in the eastside community and all across the country.

The April 6 forum, held in a very public place, was intended to empower LGBTQ people of color – people like José Hernandez – and to expose and educate Boyle Height’s large immigrant population to LGBTQ issues.

It was also about respect and shedding the notions of acceptance from the past.

Stop being “decorative gays,” challenged Queen Victoria Elizabeth Ortega, a poised 33-year-old transgender Boyle Heights resident and LGBTQ activist dressed in a business suit and pumps and speaking from the stage at Mariachi Plaza.

“Lets challenge our service organizations, lets challenge our families… we have to do it with respeto (respect)…” to lessen the suffering caused by discrimination, especially among the youth, Ortega urged the more than 100 people in attendance.

During the opening ceremony, speakers addressed the serious issues of bullying, suicide, discrimination and being forced to live as outcasts due to sexual orientation. Participants were encouraged to become agents of change and to raise the discourse bar from putting up with being “tolerated” to receiving “respect”.

“Today inspires the vision, a heartfelt hope that I and all the other LGBT members and people like me will be able to walk to dinner in Boyle Heights or any community in which we live, holding the hand of our wife or husband, accompanied by our children and to feel safe and be an integral part of our community… We hope you can share this vision with us,” said Ari Gutierrez, chairwoman of the Latino Equality Alliance, an organization established in response to Proposition 8, which is now under review by the U.S. Supreme Court.

Gutierrez said the forum was the first time an openly gay event has been held in Boyle Heights and it was the first time the community had been brought together to talk about the safety and health of Lesbian Gay Bisexual Transgender and Queer identifying youth.

“Its the first time we can stand in our community, in a public plaza and say to the world that tolerance is not enough,” she said. “When it comes to discussing LGBT issues with our families and our friends, love, compassion, communication and understanding of our shared values are key to a whole and well society.”

Growing up, Queen Victoria Elizabeth Ortega lived in the Wyvernwood apartments. She told the audience that she’s been discriminated against and harassed, and regularly called names when she jogs around the Evergreen Cemetery jogging path.

“We need to claim our space, we need to make this happen for ourselves,” Ortega said.

Born the only ‘male’ child in her family, she felt pressured to carry on the family’s name and “seed”.

It took about six years and her mother’s death to get where she is today, and to have her father’s support.

“[My mother’s passing] allowed me and my father to have that uncomfortable silence that is needed; there will be uncomfortable silence today… I challenge you to work through it, that is what this space is needed for,” Ortega said.

Her father, 71-year-old Adrian, said he was immediately ostracized by family and friends when he began to support his daughter, but he could not turn his back on his “Vicky Lou” (his pet name for his daughter), he told EGP.

The pressure and humiliation can take its toll on families but its harder on the youth.

According to the event organizers, LGBTQ youth, especially minorities, face issues of bullying at home, in school and in the community which often leads to family separation, homelessness, high-risk health behavior that can expose them to HIV/AIDS and an early death. In addition, LGBT students are 1.4 times more likely to be suspended than their straight peers, organizers said.

White House LGBTQ Liaison, Gautam Raghavan, said that many victims of hate crimes nationwide are disproportionately minority, LGBT people. He said the Obama Administration has adopted policy changes to help protect and ensure equitable treatment for LGBT persons.

“I hope that if you take something with you from me being here today, I hope its the knowledge that the President of the United States, The White House and the entire administration are with you every step of the way,” he said, encouraging attendees to be advocates for LGBT equality.

The time has come to evolve beyond just being tolerated, according to LAPD Assistant Chief Sandy Jo MacArthur. While the LAPD and society have made some advances since she joined the police department in 1980, MacArthur said being “tolerant” of LGBTQ persons is not enough.

“I was tolerated, it didn’t feel very good. I think everyone out there has been tolerated at some time. Tolerance stinks. It was really a bad concept from the start but people thought it was [at least] a start. I’m here to tell you that what we need to look forward and strive for is respect. Tolerance is just not cutting it, and respect is where we need to be.”

MacArthur said it is very important for the LAPD to respect everyone, regardless of where you’re from, who you love or what country you come from.

“Change is about education. One of the best way to bring about change is to talk about the stories, how each one of you has been impacted by things in society that are just not right,” she said.

When Univision Reporter Norma Roque’s brother came out of the closet, most of her family still embraced him, she told the audience in Spanish.

But that’s not the norm.

“We need to stop the jokes [about LGBTQ people], she said. “That’s everyone’s task… if you hear someone joke, speak up, say ‘that [joke] is not acceptable.’”

What will the LGBTQ community’s narrative be in the future, questioned Diego Sepulveda, a queer undocumented youth from South Los Angeles.

“A time of change is coming and it’s in the making, and it’s up to us to take our rightful place in it. So I encourage you to be an advocate for the LGBT community and everyone who wishes to have a place in society and they should.”

For more information, visit www.calendow.org or www.latinoequalityalliance.com


New Basketballs A ‘Slam Dunk’ Hit at Salesian High

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

Former CSUN Basketball coach Bobby Braswell joined Sportscaster Jim Hill and Councilmember Huizar at Salesian High on April 4 for a basketball giveaway and training session. (Courtesy Office of Councilmember Jose Huizar)

Sportscaster Jim Hill paid a special visit on April 4 to Salesian High School in Boyle Heights where he donated special basketballs and held a mini basketball clinic featuring “SlamBall” Star Anthony White.

The “Dribblepro” basketballs donated are a special training tool, developed by Basketball Legend Henry Bibby, an NBA coach and former Champion USC coach.

Dribblepro basketballs look and feel like regular basketballs but have four protrusions nodules that can change the angle of ball’s bounce. The anomalies of the Dribblopro cause players to concentrate more on handling the ball in order to better control the dribbling. Beside requiring more concentration and focus, the training ball is meant to improve hand-eye coordination, rhythm, reaction time, agility and intuition, according to a press release.

“In Southern California, I have been given a lot of opportunities to play basketball and do what I love to do,” Bibby said in a press release. “It’s important to me to give back so that other kids can have the experiences I’ve had.”

During the interactive mini clinic, Anthony White a former USC basketball stand out and a celebrated “SlambBall” player. SlamBall is a form of basketball played with four trampolines in front of a net, the game is a full contact sport.

Boyle Heights Car Chase Ends in Crash, Arrest

April 11, 2013 by · Leave a Comment 

A man in a stolen car crashed into a parked vehicle at the end of a brief chase in Boyle Heights Wednesday morning and was taken into custody, police said.

Officers attempted to stop the stolen Honda Accord around 1:50 p.m. but the suspect fled and crashed about one minute later at the corner of Sixth and Bernal streets, said the watch commander at the Los Angeles Police Department’s Hollenbeck Station.

The Honda was reported stolen out of Montebello, he said.

The suspect had abrasions on his face as he was taken from the crash scene in the back of a police cruiser, a news photographer reported from the scene.

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