Montebello School Celebrates First Graduating Class

June 18, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Over 140 students made history Tuesday, becoming the first-ever graduating class of the Applied Technology Center in Montebello.

The 147 graduates started off as freshman and the sole class at ATC when it opened its doors in 2011. The school added a new grade each year, and now has students in grades 9-12.

Graduates at the Applied Technology Center in Montebello were all smiles Tuesday after becoming the school’s first graduating class.  (Montebello Unified School District)

Graduates at the Applied Technology Center in Montebello were all smiles Tuesday after becoming the school’s first graduating class. (Montebello Unified School District)

ATC is unique among the five high schools in the Montebello Unified School District. ATC students participate in one of four project-based learning pathways: Culinary Hospitality Educational Foundations (CHEF), Architecture Construction Engineering (ACE), Public and Legal Services (PALS) or Health Sciences.

“I am honored and humbled to be here today celebrating each of them as they make history and make their mark in the world,” said MUSD President Edgar Cisneros.

“Congratulations to the Class of 2015.”

Something’s Cooking at MUSD High School

April 30, 2015 by · 2 Comments 

When the third period bell rings at the Applied Technology Center in Montebello, students like Jeeb Gonzalez get to work chopping vegetables, measuring ingredients, plating appetizers and cooking everything from breakfast burritos to fried chicken in the school’s state-of-the-art kitchen.

The pleasing aromas from their culinary creations fill the air, sparking pangs of hunger in anyone nearby.

But food is not the only thing students in ATC’s Culinary, Hospitality, and Educational Foundations (CHEF) pathway have been cooking up.

For the last couple of months, the students have been busily planning for the grand opening of their very own, on campus student-run bistro.

Bistro XV, named for the year of the school’s first graduating class, formally opened Wednesday with a special ribbon-cutting ceremony at the café where school staff and visitors can now buy breakfast and lunch meals prepared entirely by students.

Students at the Applied Technology Center chop and prepare ingredients for their student-run bistro.  (Montebello Unified School District)

Students at the Applied Technology Center chop and prepare ingredients for their student-run bistro. (Montebello Unified School District)

“These students are doing everything you would be doing in a bonafide restaurant,” said ATC Principal Sterling Schubert.

Not only do they do the cooking, they also take care of all the details that go into running a restaurant, according to Schubert.

We never dreamed we would one day be serving the food we cook to paying customers, Senior Kimberly Moran, the bistro’s business manager told EGP

Students said they had been pushing school administrators to let them open a restaurant on campus since 2011, when the program first started.

“Now, we finally get to open and serve people,” Moran said excitedly.

“Now you get to see how passionate we are: You get to see how much effort and love we put into every order,” she said.

Moran may only be 17-years-old but she has all the same responsibilities an adult restaurant manager would have, including overseeing the not-for-profit student-led enterprise’s finances.

Similarly, Executive Chef Jose Cruz and Gonzalez, who serves as sous chef, oversee work in the kitchen, making sure all food orders are up to their standard before they go out to the customer.

As a group, the class discusses the restaurant’s budget, taking into consideration the cost of ingredients before placing orders and developing the Bistro’s menu.

This is nothing like what a typical high school student does, explained Cruz. “I don’t think you can describe the experience,” he said.

Students in ATC’s CHEF pathway attend class in a multi-million dollar kitchen referred to as the “teaching lab.” The equipment they use is of the same quality and caliber found in some top commercial kitchens, says Debbie B. Silveira, an instructor in the culinary arts program.

The goal is for the bistro to eventually be self-sustaining so that it does not have to rely on what it can get from the school’s budget, Schubert said.

The bistro — which currently serves chilaquiles, huevos rancheros and even nopales — has its own separate entrance that allows visitors to enter from the street rather than having to go through the school.

The CHEF pathway is one of four comprehensive, pathways offered at the small school that closely mirrors college and careers. About 160 of the school’s 650 students are in the program. ATC’s instructional approach is project-based learning that requires critical thinking, communication and working as a team. The classes are taught by instructors who have experience in their respective fields.

ATC students in the Culinary Hospitality Foundations Pathway have class in a state of the art kitchen.  (Courtesy of Sterling Schubert)

ATC students in the Culinary Hospitality Foundations Pathway have class in a state of the art kitchen. (Courtesy of Sterling Schubert)

Students working at Bistro XV “are licensed to prepare and serve food to the public,” said Silveira, explaining the students passed the tests required to receive a California Food Handler Card.

The students have also catered events throughout the District as well as a teacher’s wedding.

Gonzalez told EGP that one of his best times in the program came two years ago when the students were given the opportunity to cater a UCLA event at the Rose Bowl. That’s when he decided to pursue a career in culinary arts, Gonzalez said.

“How many high school students do you know have been to the Rose Bowl and catered an event there,” chimed in Cruz, his face beaming with pride.

“We’re high school students, but we have the [same] real world experience of someone in college.”

Bistro XV is open 9:50-10:10am and 12:10-12:45p.m. Tuesday and Thursdays. ATC is located at 1200 W. Mines Ave. 

Estudiantes Obtienen Una Mirada Más Cercana al ‘Acceso a la Universidad’

May 29, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

Deseosos de obtener más información para ir a la universidad, estudiantes del Distrito Escolar Unificado de Montebello recorrieron el campus de Cal State LA, con la esperanza de hacer más fácil el proceso de admisión a la universidad.

Decenas de estudiantes de los grados 10 y 11 del programa Today CollegeBound en el Centro de Tecnología Aplicada en Montebello (ATC por sus siglas en inglés) y sus padres, recientemente pasaron una mañana de sábado para aprender más acerca de un proceso que, en cierta forma a muchos les parece muy extraño.

El programa Today CollegeBound empata a mentores con estudiantes del segundo semestre del décimo grado. El grupo de mentores, compuesto por recién graduados de la universidad y profesionales, se unen con un grupo de estudiantes hasta que se gradúen de la escuela secundaria.

El programa tiene como objetivo ayudar a los estudiantes, la mayoría de los cuales serían los primeros en sus familias en asistir a la universidad, con el largo y complicado proceso de elaboración, aplicación y encontrar maneras de pagar la universidad.

Estudiantes del Centro de Tecnología Aplicada en Montebello toman un tour por el campus de Cal State LA. (EGP foto por Nancy Martinez)

Estudiantes del Centro de Tecnología Aplicada en Montebello toman un tour por el campus de Cal State LA. (EGP foto por Nancy Martinez)

Para Julie Flores, estudiante de segundo año en el ATC, el recorrido por el campus de Cal State LA, la hizo pensar en todo lo que se involucra para llegar a la universidad, tales como tomar el SAT (examen de admisión de la universidad), las clases de requeridas de preparatoria A-G para la admisión y cómo llenar correctamente todos los formularios que son parte del proceso de solicitud.

“Están tratando de que tengamos la mentalidad de ir a la universidad”, dijo Flores sobre el programa y el recorrido.

Como la primera de la familia que planea solicitar para la universidad, Flores dijo que quiere estar asegura que esta lista para su último año, cuando las solicitudes universitarias se entregan.

“Mis padres no saben nada acerca de [las solicitudes]”, dijo. “Quiero aprender sobre esto para poder explicarle a mis padres”.

Su padre, Zeno Flores, dijo a EGP que Julie está motivada para aprender más sobre el proceso de la universidad.

“Yo podría ayudarla, pero sería más complicado” para mi tratar de entenderlo, dijo. “Este programa está creado para ayudarla a solicitar [a la universidad]”.

Pero Zeno Flores no es el único. Guadalupe González dijo a EGP que ella aprecia el Programa CollegeBound porque llena la falta de información que su hijo necesita para aplicar para la universidad y que ella como madre tendría un momento difícil para ayudarlo.

“No estaba informada anteriormente”, dijo, refiriéndose a algunos de los plazos que ella aprendió durante el tour de la universidad. “Estoy aprendiendo … si no fuera por el programa tendría que ver en el Internet y obtener más información de los consejeros” para tratar de resolverlo, dijo.

Y mientras algunos estudiantes están preocupados con tener un buen puntaje en sus exámenes SAT, tener buenos grados y escribir ensayos personales, Juan Cruz, el hijo de González le dijo a EGP que el esta más preocupado de como va a pagar la universidad.

“Creo que estoy mentalmente preparado para el colegio, pero no creo estar listo financieramente”, dijo. Su mamá comparte la misma preocupación.

“Lo que se me hace más difícil es la parte monetaria”, dijo González. “ ¿De dónde vamos a sacar el dinero para pagar las clases?”

Aunque el tour no incluyó información detallada sobre la colegiatura, José Flores y su hija Mel se dieron cuenta que si hay una diferencia entre los costos de universidades.

“Estamos aprendiendo, no sabemos mucho”, dijo.

Y pese a tener un hijo mayor que asistirá a una universidad en el norte de California en el otoño, José dice que el Programa CollegeBound le ayudará a su hija.

“Va a ser más fácil ya que todavía estamos en el proceso”, dijo.

Por ahora, estudiantes como Roberto Viramontes, del décimo grado en ATC esperará para pensar como pagará la universidad y mientras quiere enfocarse en asegurarse de tener buenos grados y asegurarse de que sus clases lo harán elegible para la admisión.

“Tenemos que aprender más sobre universidades de lo que hemos aprendido”, dijo Viramontes refiriéndose al paseo de Cal State LA. “Ellos hablaron sobre las cosas que ellos buscan en las solicitudes… y eso es muy importante”.

Cruz dijo que ahora el comprende que solicitar para la universidad no solo se trata del estudiante pero de la escuela también.

“Aprendí que una de las cosas mas importantes sobre la universidad es que tu te debes sentir cómodo, yo personalmente nunca había pensado en eso”, dijo. Para el, eso significa que su búsqueda de universidades será más de lo que solo escucha o lee.

“Eso me motiva a ir y visitar mas universidades”, dijo.

—-

Twitter @nancyreporting

nmartinez@egpnews.com

Copyright © 2015 Eastern Group Publications/EGPNews, Inc. ·