From Sports to Protests, Shooting L.A.

February 2, 2018 by · Leave a Comment 

I had a dream, to one day photograph NFL football teams.

It’s a dream that got its inspiration from the pages of a newspaper, with a 1974 photograph in the Herald Examiner of L.A. Rams running back Lawrence McCutcheon going over the top and into the end zone.

Photographer                Fred Zermeno

 

I was 14-years-old and selling the newspaper on the corner of Wabash and Evergreen and all I could think about was “How did they freeze this photo?” How did they capture all of the photos, for that matter? I was hooked.

Ten years later I walked into the offices of EGP where I met Jonathan and Dolores Sanchez. I told them about my dream and they gave me a chance, and the start of a 34-year career photographing past and present L.A. sports teams, including the Raiders, Rams, Chargers, Dodgers, Lakers, Clippers, as well as high school and college teams.

Oscar De La Hoya (EGP Archive Photo by Fred Zermeno)

Todd Gurley with his best performance to date combined for 180 yards and four touchdowns against the Seattle Seahawks. (EGP File Photo by Fred Zermeno)

 

My lens has captured many of Los Angeles’ most historic moments, from the immigration marches of 2006 that drew over a million people, to the Women’s March in downtown LA., the inauguration of the city’s first Latino mayor, and so many more.

There have been the parades, from East LA to the Rose Parade, the big name musicians and too many mariachi and folklorico groups to count. There have been the press conferences, school events, days of service, crime scenes and L.A. floods, fires, and sunsets.  I hope EGP’s readers have gotten as much enjoyment out of my photos that have graced the pages of EGP newspapers over the last three decades, as I did taking them.

Thanks EGP for making a dream a reality.

(Photo by Fred Zermeno)

Trump Terminates DACA: Protesters begin to gather at L.A. City Hall for march to federal building. (EGP photo by Fred Zermeno)

As many as one million people marched in Los Angeles for immigrants’ rights during previous May Day marches. Organizers of coming May 1 march hope to attract 100,000 protesters to downtown L.A. (EGP photo archives)

(Photo by Fred Zermeno)

Vince Scully gives the fans thumbs up and thanks them once again by singing “Take Me Out To The Ball Park” in the seventh inning. (Photo by Fred Zermeno)

Concejales de LA y el alcalde Eric Garcetti se preparan para sonar la campana. (EGP foto por Fred Zermeno)

Con la mitad del número de jugadores y un campo de la mitad del tamaño de lo que ves en la NFL, la cancha de fútbol americano de KISS Los Angeles es el doble de rápido, con mayor puntuación y acción sin parar. (EGP Foto por Fred Zermeño)

With embattled Exide as their backdrop, protesters on Monday called on state legislators to get tough with polluters and to protect the public. (EGP photo by Fred Zermeno)

Kobe Bryant, pictured here at last year’s victory parade, hopes to repeat the Laker’s championship status with a victory tonight. (EGP Photo by Fred Zermeno)

Angelenos turned out by the thousands on Monday for a parade to pay tribute to 2010 NBA Champs the Los Angeles Lakers. (EGP photo by Fred Zermeno)

Excited L.A. Laker fans fill streets near Staples Center in hopes of seeing NBA champions. (EGP Photo by Fred Zermeno)

 

 

 

Rams Coming Back to L.A.

January 12, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

The NFL will return to the Southland, with National Football League owners approving plans today for the St. Louis Rams to move to a proposed stadium in Inglewood, with an option for the Chargers to share the facility if the team can’t reach a viable stadium deal in San Diego.

The decision, made on a 30-2 vote by league owners in Houston, marks a long-awaited return of the NFL to the Los Angeles area, which hasn’t had a team since 1994. The decision also opens the door for the city and county of San Diego to reopen negotiations with the Chargers to keep them from moving, while giving the team a safety net if such talks break down again.

But the deal is also a major snub to the city of Carson, where the Chargers and Raiders had planned to build a $1.7 billion, 72,000-seat stadium.

With NFL owners rejecting that option, the Raiders pulled out of the deal, meaning that team will remain in Oakland — at least for now.

For Inglewood, however, the decision is a major economic leap forward. Rams owner Stan Kroenke plans to build a $1.86 billion, 80,000-seat stadium to house his team on the site of the former Hollywood Park Racetrack.

It’s unclear if the Chargers would actually join the Rams in Inglewood, with Chargers Chairman Dean Spanos repeatedly insisting he was committed to the Carson project, and had no interest in simply being a tenant in a stadium owned by Kroenke. Spanos made his feelings clear on the topic in a letter he sent last month to NFL Commissioner Roger Goodell.

Spanos has wanted a replacement for aging Qualcomm Stadium for around 15 years, a quest stymied by the city of San Diego’s fiscal problems of a decade ago, the recession and difficulty in finding a suitable site.

When Kroenke proposed about a year ago building a stadium in Inglewood, the Chargers responded by announcing plans to construct their own playing facility in Carson – possibly in concert with the Raiders.

The Chargers, who have played in San Diego for 55 years, contend that 25 percent of their business comes from Los Angeles, Orange County and the Inland Empire.

San Diego Mayor Kevin Faulconer countered by establishing a task force that recommended building a new facility next to Qualcomm Stadium.

The Chargers broke off negotiations on the proposal in June. The team’s refusal to restart talks prevented what could have been a citywide vote on the proposal this month.

An NFL team has not played in the Los Angeles area since 1994.

The Los Angeles Raiders played at Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum from 1982-1994, before returning to Oakland in 1995. The Los Angeles Rams played in the Coliseum from 1946-1979 and at what was then known as Anaheim Stadium from 1980-1994 before moving to St. Louis in 1995.

The Chargers played at the Coliseum in their inaugural 1960 season when they were a member of the American Football League, then moved to San Diego in 1961.

Charger’s QB Phillip Rivers: Best in the Game

December 10, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

The San Diego Chargers are having a tough year. With just four games to go in the regular season, the Chargers’ horrible 3-9 record has them in last place in the AFC West.
Their 17-3 loss last Sunday to the 10-2 Denver Broncos all but ended their season.
The Chargers’ one bright light remains Quarterback Phillip Rivers, who despite the odds never gives up. He’s shown himself to be a leader on and off the field.

San Diego Chargers quarterback Phillip Rivers.  (Photo by Fred Zermeno)

San Diego Chargers quarterback Phillip Rivers. (Photo by Fred Zermeno)

Rivers is now the Franchise’s all-time passing leader. With over 40,000 yards, he’s also the 17th all-time passing leader in the NFL, achieving his 10th consecutive 3,000-yard this season with four games still to be played.
“I’m really looking forward to our final accomplishments for this year and next year’s team,” River’s said. “We have some great young talent and I see a lot of potential in our team,” rivers said, pointing out that the team faced with “some tough injuries this year.”
Off the field, Rivers works with foster teens to make sure they have the resources they need to carry them through tough times. In 2011, he was named one of three finalists for the Walter Payton NFL Man of the Year Award for his work with the Rivers of Hope Foundation, an endeavor he and his wife oversaw from 2010-12 to help foster children.

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