Ending DACA Could Have Dire Public Health Consequences

September 21, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

President Obama signed an executive order in 2012 protecting undocumented immigrants who were brought to the United States as children, and studies suggest that this order, known as Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA), markedly improved measures of mental health among its beneficiaries and their families. The pending termination of DACA may reverse these mental health benefits for the 800,000 DACA beneficiaries, and trigger a public health crisis, according to an essay in the New England Journal of Medicine, co-authored by Atheendar. S. Venkataramani, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of medical ethics and health policy at Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania.

“DACA was not a public health program by design,” Venkataramani said, “but numerous studies have shown that implementing it had positive effects on mental health that truly rival those from large-scale health policies.”

DACA is meant to cover undocumented immigrants who were born after June 15, 1981, were brought to the U.S. before turning 16, and have lived in the U.S. continuously since 2007. It provides legal access to work permits, which can be renewed every two years, and confers freedom from deportation. Eligible applicants must provide evidence of current school attendance, completion of high school or GED certification, or U.S. military service, and must not have serious criminal records.

Several recent studies, including one by Venkataramani and essay co-author Alexander Tsai, MD, PhD, an assistant professor of Psychiatry at Massachusetts General Hospital, have indicated that measures of psychological stress and mental illness among DACA-eligible immigrants fell dramatically after the policy began. Another study, which used data from the Emergency Medicaid program in Oregon, suggested that DACA’s mental health benefits may have extended even to the children of DACA-eligible mothers—among whom rates of adjustment and anxiety disorders fell by more than half after DACA started.

Given that DACA improved mental health for beneficiaries and their families, its termination is expected to have the opposite effect. That termination will occur in March 2018 if no DACA-preserving legislation is passed by Congress and signed into law by the President.

“Health care and public health professionals now have a limited window of opportunity to engage policymakers about protecting Dreamers through legislative action, with an emphasis on the potentially dire mental health consequences of failing to enact a definitive legal remedy,” Venkataramani said.

If such efforts fail and DACA does expire next year, the health care profession will face a serious challenge, he added. Many former DACA beneficiaries, in the absence of the law’s protections, will not only experience adverse effects on mental health and psychological well being, but will also be less likely—because of their status as deportable illegals—to seek help from health care professionals.

Venkataramani and Tsai argue that if DACA expires, health care and public health organizations will need to proactively reach out to undocumented immigrants, to reassure them of continued access to quality health care and to provide them with information about public mental health care resources.

“On a broader systems level, tracking health care utilization and health outcomes will help organizations monitor health at the population level and provide hard data to policymakers seeking to implement other supportive remedies,” they note.

City, County, State Take Up Fight to Defend DACA

September 14, 2017 by · 1 Comment 

The Trump administration’s decision to end DACA, the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals
initiative, has sparked a whirlwind of activity at the city, county and state level, all aimed at thwarting the president’s action and to push Congress to adopt a permanent solution for the hundreds of thousands of immigrants brought to the country illegally as children.

The protests and promises of legal battles is not surprising given that one in four DACA recipients – or about 200,000 of the young beneficiaries – live in California.

Speaking in Los Angeles Tuesday, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra vowed to fight the decision “on every front.”

Becerra, joined by the attorneys general for Minnesota, Maryland and Maine, filed a lawsuit Monday in San Francisco against the administration, arguing that the federal government violated the Constitution and federal laws when it moved to rescind DACA.

“The DACA initiative has allowed more than 800,000 Dreamers — children brought to this country without documentation — to come out of the shadows and become successful and productive Americans,” Becerra said following a roundtable meeting with immigration advocates in downtown Los Angeles. “I’ve never seen a time in our country when we punish kids for coming out of the
shadows.”

Last week, the University of California filed suit against the administration on grounds that the decision would violate the due process rights of thousands of immigrant UC students. That same day, Los Angeles Councilman Jose Huizar introduced a motion directing the city attorney to either file his own lawsuit or to join the state’s lawsuit being promised by Becerra.

On Tuesday, Los Angeles County supervisors added their voices, adopting a measure to support the lawsuits brought by other government bodies and to pursue a financial boycott of sorts of states “unfriendly” to DACA by banning county employees from traveling to those states on county business.

California’s Attorney General Tells Dreamers to Reapply

According to Becerra, with the help of the state’s 200,000 DACA recipients, California has become “the sixth largest economy in the world.”

Federal immigration officials are no longer accepting new requests for DACA, but the agency is hearing two-year DACA renewal requests received by Oct. 5 from current beneficiaries whose benefits will expire before March 5.

Flanked by representatives from immigrant rights groups, Becerra said Tuesday that financial help is available to cash-strapped Dreamers who don’t have the $495 renewal fee. “If you have the opportunity, submit your paperwork,” the attorney general said. “We don’t want anyone to be deprived of the chance to reapply.”

Cynthia Buiza, executive director of the California Immigrant Policy Center, urged recipients not to “make money an issue.”

Added Martha Arevalo, executive director of the Central American Resource Center: “Don’t let financial concerns be a reason not to reapply. We can find solutions.”

Becerra said the DACA phase-out indirectly affects millions of residents, as well as businesses, nonprofits, and the state’s towns and cities.

“We’ll do whatever we can to win,” he said.

Fifteen other states have also filed a lawsuit challenging the end of the DACA program.

UC Is First University System to Enter Legal Battle

The UC’s lawsuit filed Sept. 8 in San Francisco against the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and its acting secretary, Elaine Duke, is the first of its kind to be filed by a university. The lawsuit alleges the Trump administration failed to provide proper notice to the impacted population as required by law.

”As a result of the defendants’ actions, the Dreamers face expulsion from the only country that they call home, based on nothing more than unreasoned executive whim,” the complaint reads. UC President Janet Napolitano, who was secretary of DHS from 2009 to 2013, spearheaded the Obama administration’s creation of the DACA program in 2012, setting in place a rigorous application and security review process, according to the lawsuit.

Applicants for DACA were only approved if they were in or had graduated from high school or college, or were in the military, or an honorably discharged veteran. They cannot have been convicted of a felony or major misdemeanor or otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety.

“Neither I, nor the University of California, take the step of suing the federal government lightly, Napolitano said. “It is imperative, however, that we stand up for these vital members of the UC community.”

The lawsuit asks the court to set aside Trump’s  action because it is “unconstitutional, unjust, and unlawful.”

L.A. Councilman Calls for City Attorney to Join Lawsuits

Roughly 100,000 DACA recipients are believed to live in the Los Angeles area. A motion introduced last week by L.A. Councilman Jose Huizar states, “These Dreamers were brought here as children and have proven themselves to be lawful residents contributing to the social fabric and diversity of the United States.” It also instructs City Attorney Mike Feuer to pursue legal action on behalf of the city to defend their presence.

When asked to comment on the motion, Feuer spokesman Rob Wilcox said, “Our office is already in discussions with other government entities on how best to maximize our impact on fighting the removal of DACA.”

County to Support Lawsuits, Boycott DACA-unfriendly States

County supervisors voted Tuesday to institute a travel ban on DACA-unfriendly states and to support legal challenges to Trump’s order ending the policy.

Supervisor Hilda Solis championed a one-year restriction on county government travel to nine states that threatened legal action to end the program, saying it could “cost the United States approximately $460 billion in GDP.”

Texas, Alabama, Arkansas, Idaho, Kansas, Louisiana, Nebraska, South Carolina and West Virginia will be subject to the travel restriction, which will not apply in the case of emergency assistance for disaster relief or critical law enforcement work.

The vote was 3-1, with Supervisor Kathryn Barger dissenting and Supervisor Mark Ridley-Thomas abstaining, though they both support DACA and voted in favor of related measures.

The young adults nationwide affected by the administration’s action are contributing to America’s economy, not taking from it, said Sonja Diaz, founding director of UCLA’s Latino Policy & Politics Initiative.

“Ninety-one percent of DACA recipients are employed. DACA is a net positive for the U.S. economy” and ending it would cost California alone $11.3 billion,” Diaz told the board.

David Rattray, executive vice president of the Los Angeles Area Chamber of Commerce, promised the support of business leaders in any fight to restore the program.

Employers have invested in hiring and training so-called Dreamers and are “dumbfounded about how stupid this is, frankly,” Rattray told the board.

Barger, the only Republican on the non-partisan board, said the county should take an aggressive, hands-on role in pressing Congressional representatives to craft new legislation.

“We need to be at the table and we need to push as hard as we can,” Barger said. “This is bipartisan, this is about doing what is right,” quoting then-President Barack Obama’s 2012 remarks saying DACA was “a temporary stopgap measure” to give Congress time to act.

“Congress needs to get to work, they’ve had over five years to do it,” Barger said. “If Congress does not act in six months, shame on them.”

Ridley-Thomas proposed having county lawyers file “friend of the court” briefs in support of several states suing the Trump administration.

DACA recipients are entitled, Ridley-Thomas said, to “the right to privacy, the right to work, the right to move within the halls of government and elsewhere without wondering if someone is going to report you or snatch you.”

The vote on amicus briefs was 4-1, with Barger dissenting.

Based on Solis’ motion, the board will also send a letter to the president and Congress demanding legislative action, a move that garnered unanimous support. The board also directed the county’s Office of Immigrant Affairs to help existing DACA recipients renew their status by Oct. 5.

Supervisor Sheila Kuehl introduced a motion to add immigration to a county list of policy priorities, which currently include homelessness, child protection, reform of the Sheriff’s Department, integration of county health services, and environmental oversight and monitoring.

The board’s vote in favor of the new priority was unanimous.

CA Destinará Fondos para Beneficiarios de DACA

September 14, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Los líderes legislativos de California anunciaron el martes un acuerdo con el gobernador del estado, Jerry Brown, para destinar 30 millones de dólares para ayudas a los beneficiarios de la Acción Diferida (DACA).

La decisión de los legisladores californianos busca ayudar a los jóvenes “soñadores” que perderán su permiso de trabajo y su protección después de que la Administración del presidente Donald Trump anunciase la cancelación del programa en marzo de 2018.

“No permitiremos que un hombre con tendencias xenófobas socave los años de progreso que hemos hecho en California para integrar a estos jóvenes adultos en nuestra sociedad y nuestra economía”, declaró el martes el presidente del Senado, el demócrata Kevin de León, al hacer el anuncio.

Bajo el programa Una California, se administrarán 20 millones de dólares para subsidiar servicios legales de inmigración para los beneficiarios de DACA y otros 10 millones serán dirigidos a centros de educación universitaria pública.

“Los nuevos fondos para servicio de DACA que estamos adicionando al presupuesto ofrecerán respuestas y ayuda a los jóvenes californianos para permanecer en el único país que conocen”, declaró el martes el presidente de la Asamblea, el demócrata Anthony Rendón.

Siete de los diez millones de dólares de ayuda financiera para estudios universitarios serán asignados a los Colegios Comunitarios de California, dos millones de dólares serán administrados por la Universidad Estatal de California a través del programa Préstamos de Sueño y un millón irá a través del mismo fondo a la Universidad de California.

“A Donald Trump puede gustarle el caos. Estos chicos no merecen eso”, concluyó Rendón.

Según un análisis del Instituto de Política Pública de California (PPIC), en California residen cerca de 223,000 beneficiarios del DACA, más de un cuarto del total nacional, y la entidad calculó que aproximadamente 70,000 soñadores estudian en universidades públicas de California.

Dems, Trump Discuss Deal to Protect ‘Dreamers’

September 13, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

WASHINGTON – Democratic leaders in Congress said following a Wednesday night meeting with President Donald Trump that they have agreed to work together to provide legal protection to the 800,000 undocumented youths known as “Dreamers.”

They also agreed, according to the Democrats’ version, to negotiate a budget package to finance border security that is “acceptable to both parties,” and therefore excludes funding for Trump’s proposed border wall between the U.S. and Mexico.

“We had a very productive meeting at the White House with the President. The conversation centered on DACA and we agreed to quickly enshrine DACA protections in a law,” said Senate Democratic leader Chuck Schumer (D-N.Y.) and House Democratic Leader, Nancy Pelosi, (D-Calif.) who dined with Trump on Wednesday.

The White House, on its own behalf, also gave its version of the meeting in a statement that did not speak of “agreements” of any kind with Schumer and Pelosi.

According to the White House, Trump and the Democratic leaders spoke at a “constructive” dinner of the current “legislative priorities,” including tax reform, border security, DACA (Dreamers), infrastructure and trade, in that order.

The Trump administration said the meeting was a “positive step” toward reaching “bipartisan solutions” to the problems affecting all Americans and expressed its desire to “continue these talks” with the Democratic leaders.

If an agreement has in fact been reached, it would be second deal in a week the Republican president has reached with Congressional Democratic leadership; the first being a short-term increase in the debt ceiling  that shocked GOP leaders.

Despite his campaign rhetoric promising to end DACA on his first day in office, and to deport all immigrants in the country illegally, the president has signaled an increasing willingness to find a legislative solution that will allow young immigrants brought to the country illegally as children to remain legally in the U.S.

The president has said on several occasions that he will treat the young undocumented immigrants, most often referred to as Dreamers, with “heart.”

Last week, one day after announcing the end of DACA and giving Congress a six-month window to come up with a legislative solution, he tweeted that young undocumented immigrants protected under DACA should not fear deportation, adding he would “revisit’ the issue if the Congress failed to act.

Líderes Demócratas Acuerdan con Trump para Proteger “Soñadores”

September 13, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

WASHINGTON – Los líderes demócratas en el Congreso aseguraron haber acordado el miércoles con el presidente Donald Trump trabajar en común para brindar protección legal a los 800.000 jóvenes indocumentados conocidos como “Soñadores”, informaron en un comunicado.

También acordaron, según la versión de los demócratas, negociar un paquete presupuestario para financiar la seguridad fronteriza que “sea aceptable para las dos partes” y que, por lo tanto, excluya cualquier partida para el muro con México.

“Tuvimos un encuentro muy productivo en la Casa Blanca con el presidente. La conversación se centró en DACA. Acordamos consagrar rápidamente las protecciones de DACA en una ley”, afirmaron los líderes demócratas en el Senado, Chuck Schumer, y en la Cámara de Representantes, Nancy Pelosi, que cenaron el miércoles con Trump.

La Casa Blanca, por su lado, también dio su versión del encuentro en un comunicado en el que no habló de “acuerdos” de ningún tipo con Schumer y Pelosi.

Según la Casa Blanca, Trump y los líderes demócratas hablaron en una cena “constructiva” de las actuales “prioridades legislativas”, que incluyen la reforma tributaria, seguridad fronteriza, DACA (soñadores), infraestructura y comercio, en este orden.

El Gobierno estadounidense dijo que el encuentro fue un “paso positivo” para alcanzar “soluciones bipartidistas” a los problemas que afectan a todos los estadounidenses y mostró su deseo de “continuar estas conversaciones” con los líderes demócratas.

Trump puso fin la semana pasada al programa Acción Diferida para los llegados en la Infancia (DACA, por sus siglas en inglés), programa que promovió el expresidente Barack Obama en 2012 y que ha protegido de la deportación y otorgado permisos de trabajo a 800.000 jóvenes indocumentados que llegaron de niños al país y a los que se conoce como “Soñadores” o “Dreamers”.

La suspensión, sin embargo, no se hará efectiva hasta dentro de seis meses para forzar al Congreso a encontrar una alternativa al programa de Obama.

UC Sues Trump Administration Over DACA Repeal

September 9, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

The University of California on Friday filed a federal lawsuit against the Trump administration for allegedly violating the constitutional rights of the college system and its students, including those at its Los Angeles and Irvine campuses, by rescinding the DACA program on “nothing more than unreasoned executive whim,” and a city of Los Angeles councilman introduced a motion directing the city attorney to either file his own lawsuit or join one planned by the state of California which was announced Wednesday by Atty. Gen. Xavier Becerra.

The Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program protects immigrants who were brought to the country illegally when they were children to safely live, work and study without fear of deportation.

The UC’s lawsuit filed in San Francisco against the U.S. Department of Homeland Security (DHS) and its acting secretary, Elaine Duke, is the first to be filed by a university seeking to stop the Trump administration’s decision to end the DACA program, which currently protects over 800,000 undocumented young people. The lawsuit alleges the Trump administration failed to provide proper notice to the impacted population as required by law.

”As a result of the defendants’ actions, the Dreamers face expulsion from the only country that they call home, based on nothing more than unreasoned executive whim,” the complaint reads. UC President Janet Napolitano, who was secretary of DHS from 2009 to 2013, spearheaded the Obama administration’s creation of the DACA program in 2012, setting in place a rigorous application and security review process, according to the lawsuit.

UC President Janet Napolitano, who was secretary of DHS from 2009 to 2013, spearheaded the Obama administration’s creation of the DACA program in 2012. (New America Media)

UC President Janet Napolitano, who was secretary of DHS from 2009 to 2013, spearheaded the Obama administration’s creation of the DACA program in 2012. (New America Media)

Applicants for DACA were only approved if they were in or had graduated from high school or college, or were in the military, or an honorably discharged veteran They cannot have been convicted of a felony or major misdemeanor or otherwise pose a threat to national security or public safety. “Neither I, nor the University of California, take the step of suing the federal government lightly, especially not the very agency that I led,” Napolitano said in a statement released by the UC. “It is imperative, however, that we stand up for these vital members of the UC community. They represent the best of who we are — hard working, resilient and motivated high achievers. To arbitrarily and capriciously end the DACA program, which benefits our country as a whole, is not only unlawful, it is contrary to our national values and bad policy.”

The lawsuit asks the court to set aside the Trump administration’s rescission of DACA because it is “unconstitutional, unjust, and unlawful.”

The UC system, including UCLA and UC Irvine, has roughly 4,000 undocumented students, a substantial number of whom are part of DACA, as well as teachers, researchers and health care providers who are DACA recipients, according to UC.

Roughly 200,000 of the 800,000 DACA recipients in the country live in California, and it is believed that about 100,000 live in the Los Angeles area.

“These Dreamers’ were brought here as children and have proven themselves to be lawful residents contributing to the social fabric and diversity of the United States,” states the motion introduced by L.A. Councilman Jose Huizar that instructs City Attorney Mike Feuer to pursue legal action on behalf of the city.

When asked to comment on the motion, Feuer’s spokesman Rob Wilcox said, “Our office is already in discussions with other government entities on how best to maximize our impact on fighting the removal of DACA.”

Fifteen states filed a lawsuit Wednesday challenging the end of the DACA program, but Becerra said California was planning its own suit because it is disproportionately harmed by the action.

Resolution Seeks to Officially Declare Los Angeles a ‘City of Sanctuary’

September 8, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Two City Council members introduced a resolution today seeking to brand Los Angeles a “city of sanctuary” dedicated to “protecting the human rights of all our residents.”

The move by Council President Herb Wesson and Councilman Gil Cedillo follows their receipt of a report on Thursday that civil rights attorney Peter Schey submitted to the Immigrant Affairs, Civil Rights, and Equity Committee, which Cedillo chairs and which Wesson is a member of. The report included a series of recommendations for the city to undertake in response to recent immigration policies announced by President Donald Trump.

While there is no legal definition of a sanctuary city, it generally applies to municipalities that limit cooperation with federal authorities on immigration enforcement. Embracing the term has become a way for cities to openly defy Trump, who has threatened to cut off federal funding to sanctuary cities.

“It’s a declaratory statement of our values, of our vision, of our commitments,” Cedillo told City News Service.

At the committee meeting Thursday, Cedillo said he intended to submit a sanctuary city motion, but what was submitted at the City Council meeting was a resolution. A motion generally changes an existing law or creates a new one, while a resolution is generally a public declaration that does not change or create any laws. Cedillo said he submitted a resolution because declaring the city a sanctuary does not require any change in laws.

It’s not certain when the resolution would come up for a vote.

Although Los Angeles has long limited its cooperation with the feds on immigration, it has not taken on the official label of sanctuary city, and it is unclear how much support the resolution will have from Mayor Eric Garcetti.

The mayor has resisted calling for Los Angeles to embrace the term because he says it is often used by those looking to harm cities that have friendly immigration policies.

“It is not a term that has meaning,” Garcetti said in an interview on radio station KNX Thursday. “I’m not going to buy into a frame that somebody else who’s attacking immigrants uses.”

Cedillo said he agreed with the mayor’s assessment but believed they could find common ground.

“We agree with the mayor. The mayor has been an extraordinary champion in this area, and has been absolutely responsive from the beginning, and I think we are in concert, and his points are well taken,” Cedillo said.

The Los Angeles Police Department has had a longstanding policy of not initiating contact with an individual based solely on his or her immigration status and does not give immigration agents access to its jails or inmates unless they have a federal warrant. Because of those policies, Los Angeles is often referred to as a sanctuary city, though it has never officially embraced the term as other cities have, including San Francisco and Santa Ana.

Schey, a civil rights attorney, argued in the report that Los Angeles has wide discretion in setting its own policies on immigration and that because none of its current laws are in violation of federal law, Trump’s “showboating about penalties against sanctuary cities has no basis in law and is primarily intended to dazzle his base and intimidate local officials.”

Schey also told the committee that embracing the term was an important symbolic move.

“People seem to have strong views on this name thing. My stance has always been that’s what’s important. Ultimately, yes, that sort of symbolic statement, ‘We are a city of sanctuary, we are a city of refuge,’ etc., I think it’s important. It sets a certain tone,” he said.

Cedillo said part of reason for introducing the resolution was in reaction to the Trump administration’s move Tuesday to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program which has shielded immigrants who were brought to the country illegally when they were children from deportation.

“With the changed circumstance, with the announcement on Tuesday, it turned out that we had a scheduled immigration committee meeting, and it turned out that we had a report from our advocate, and it turned out we had a deeper understanding of what it is to be a city of sanctuary,” Cedillo said. “We are confident there will be no fiscal impact on the city, no adverse consequences on the city and we want to send that message to the (DACA recipients) who are here to continue to be engaged in the civic life of this city.”

The resolution cites the LAPD’s policy on immigrant enforcement, Trump’s DACA announcement, and the city’s history of adopting policies protecting all of its residents regardless of immigration status as some of the reasons for the resolution.

Schey’s report also recommended the city take steps to help immigrants in the country illegally and DACA recipients from being detained by federal officials by facilitating legal advice and representation for them. The report also recommended the city enact a comprehensive anti-discrimination ordinance, and decriminalize minor offenses likely to be committed by low-income residents.

Talleres Legales Gratuitos Sobre Cambios en DACA

September 7, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Después de la decisión del presidente Trump de rescindir a la Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (DACA) el martes, talleres gratuitos estarán abiertos al público para aliviar sus preocupaciones y para responder cualquier pregunta que tienen durante este tiempo de incertidumbre.

El Ayuntamiento de Boyle Heights y la escuela primaria de Garfield, junto con la Red de Liderazgo del Sureste, realizaran talleres gratuitos esta semana para brindar información al público sobre los recientes cambios hechos a DACA.

Además, abogados de inmigración estarán presentes en ambos talleres para responder cualquier pregunta, por ejemplo: ¿Qué puedo esperar ahora? ¿Cuáles son mis opciones? ¿Cuáles son sus derechos legales?

El taller de la escuela primaria de Garfield se llevará a cabo en su cafetería el viernes, 8 de septiembre, desde las 5:30 a 8:30 de la tarde. Se encuentra en el bloque 7425 del sur de la avenida Garfield en la cuidad de Bell Gardens e incluirá aparcamiento gratuito.

Para más información comuníquese con Sergio Infanzón a sergiofanzon@gmail.com o con Mario Beltrán a maritobeltran@gmail.com.

El taller del Ayuntamiento de Boyle Heights se llevará a cabo el sábado, 9 de septiembre, de las 11 de la mañana a las 2 de la tarde, en la Salda de la Comunidad. Se encuentra en el bloque este del 2130 de First Street en la cuidad de Los Ángeles e incluirá aparcamiento gratuito detrás de la entrada del edificio en la calle Chicago.

Para más información comuníquese con María Torres al (323) 842-6214 o mtorres@feriaslegales.org.

Estudiantes de DACA Aún Son Bienvenidos, Dicen Oficiales de Educación Estatal y Local

September 7, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Funcionarios de educación locales y estatales denunciaron el martes los planes para eliminar gradualmente el programa de Acción Diferida para los Llegados en la Infancia (DACA) y trataron de tranquilizar a los beneficiares del programa de que aún son bienvenidos en las escuelas y campus universitarios.

“Las políticas de inscripción y matricula de la universidad no se basan en el estatus de DACA para que la inscripción, la matrícula y la ayuda financiera para los estudiantes no se ve afectada por el fin del programa”, dijo Timothy White, canciller del sistema de la Universidad Estatal de California con sede en Long Beach.

“Seguiremos esforzándonos en el compromiso de la CSU de avanzar y ampliar el conocimiento, el aprendizaje y la cultura; proporcionar oportunidades para que las personas se desarrollen intelectual, personal y profesionalmente; y para preparar egresados educados y responsables que están listos y capaces de contribuir a la cultura y la economía de California”.

La presidenta de la Universidad de California, Janet Napolitano, dijo que la decisión del presidente Donald Trump de poner fin al programa en seis meses – sin restricción alguna por parte del Congreso – era “profundamente” preocupante.

“Este movimiento de pensamientos retrógrados y de gran alcance amenaza con separar a las familias y descarrilar el futro de algunas de las mentes jóvenes más brillantes de este país, miles de las cuales actualmente asisten o se han graduado de la Universidad de California”, dijo Napolitano.

Dijo que estaba dirigiendo su comité asesor sobre “estudiantes indocumentados” para determinar “como apoyar mejor y proteger a los estudiantes de la Universidad de California que dependen de DACA durante los próximos seis meses y más allá”. Ella dijo que el sistema seguirá ofreciendo servicios a los receptores de DACA, incluidos los servicios jurídicos.

En el Distrito Escolar Unificado de Los Ángeles (LAUSD), los funcionarios enfatizaron que los planteles escolares seguirán siendo “zonas seguras”, lo que significa que los agentes federales de inmigración no serán permitidos en los campus “sin una revisión por parte de los funcionarios del distrito”.

“Estos jóvenes inmigrantes han hecho valiosas contribuciones a la comunidad y la nación que consideran su hogar y se han ganado el derecho a un lugar permanente en su historia”, dijo la superintendente de LAUSD, Michelle King.

El presidente de la Junta Directiva de Educación del LAUSD, Ref Rodríguez, dijo que los DREAMers, sean maestros o estudiantes, “han trabajado duro para contribuir a este hermoso país y ciudad”.

“Deben ser celebrados, no rechazados”, dijo. “Estamos comprometidos con fuertes esfuerzos de promoción a nivel federal y estatal, para que el Congreso encuentre el coraje de revertir esta decisión”.

El Distrito Escolar Unificado de Montebello (MUSD), el segundo más grande en el Condado de Los Ángeles, también repudió la decisión de poner fin a DACA, reiterando en un comunicado el martes que el distrito escolar está comprometido a ayudar a los estudiantes y sus familias.

“La Junta de Educación de MUSD se opone firmemente a la decisión del presidente Trump hoy de poner fin al programa de DACA”, dijeron.

“El tiempo, la energía y el dinero que se ha invertido en estos estudiantes sería una pérdida económica enorme en términos de recursos perdidos y en las contribuciones que podrían estar haciendo a nuestras comunidades”, dijo MUSD, agregando que “el estado sufrirá un mayor retroceso “en satisfacer las demandas” de una mano de obra más educada para competir en una economía mundial”.

Al unirse a la protesta contra el anuncio de la Casa Blanca, el canciller de los Colegios Comunitarios de California, Eloy Ortiz Oakley, dijo que terminar con DACA es una “decisión sin corazón y sin sentido”.

“Aquellos que son afectados por esta decisión fueron traídos a este país como niños y están persiguiendo una educación y haciendo contribuciones a su comunidad”, dijo Oakley. “Algunos han servido en las Fuerzas Armadas defendiendo este país. En California, no ponemos los sueños – o DREAMers – en espera”.

“Los Colegios Comunitarios de California continúan comprometidos a servir a todos los estudiantes, sin importar el estatus de inmigración y a proporcionar ambientes seguros y acogedores en los que aprender”.

State and Local Education Officials Urge DACA Students to Stay In School

September 7, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Local and statewide education officials Tuesday denounced plans to phase out the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program, and sought to reassure beneficiaries of the program that they are still welcome on school and university campuses.

“The university’s enrollment and tuition politics are not based on DACA status so enrollment, tuition and financial aid for students is not impacted by the ending of the program,” said Timothy White, chancellor of the Long Beach-based California State University system. “Additionally, state funding under the California Dream Act is not based on DACA status and will not change. Our mission to provide excellent educational opportunities to all Californians shall not waver,” White said.

“We will continue to vigorously pursue the CSU’s commitment to advance and extend knowledge, learning and culture; to provide opportunities for individuals to develop intellectually, personally and professionally; and to prepare educated and responsible alumni who are ready and able to contribute to California’s culture and economy.”

University of California President Janet Napolitano said the decision by President Donald Trump to end the program in six months — barring any action from Congress — was “deeply” troubling.

“This backward-thinking, far-reaching move threatens to separate families and derail the futures of some of this country’s brightest young minds, thousands of whom currently attend or have graduated from the University of California,” Napolitano said.

She said she was directing her advisory committee on “undocumented students” to determine “how to best support and protect University of California students who rely on DACA over the next six months and beyond.” She said the system will continue offering services to DACA recipients, including legal services.

At the Los Angeles Unified School District, officials stressed that school campuses will continue to be “safe zones,” meaning federal immigration agents will not be permitted on campuses “without a review by district officials.”

“These young immigrants have made valuable contributions to the community and the nation they consider their home, and they have earned the right to a permanent place in its history,” LAUSD Superintendent Michelle King said.

LAUSD Board of Education President Ref Rodriguez said DREAMers, be they teachers or students, “have worked hard to contribute to this beautiful country and city.”

“They should be celebrated, not turned away,” he said. “We are committed to strong advocacy efforts at the federal and state levels, so that Congress will find the courage to reverse this decision.”

The Montebello Unified School District, the second largest in Los Angeles County, also repudiated the decision to end DACA, reiterating in a statement Tuesday that the school district is committed to assisting students and their families.

“The Board of Education of the Montebello Unified School District (MUSD) strongly opposes President Trump’s decision today to end the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) program,” they said.

“The time, energy, and money that has been invested into these students would be a huge economic loss in terms of resources lost and in contributions they could be making to our communities,” said MUSD, adding that “the state will suffer a major setback” in meeting demands “for a more educated workforce to compete in a world economy.”

Joining the outcry against the White House’s announcement, California Community Colleges Chancellor Eloy Ortiz Oakley said ending DACA is a “heartless and senseless decision.”

“Those who are affected by this decision were brought to this country as children and are pursuing an education and making contributions to their community,” Oakley said. “Some have served in the Armed Forces defending this country. In California, we don’t put dreams — or DREAMers — on hold.

“The California Community Colleges remain committed to serving all students, regardless of immigration status and to providing safe and welcoming environments in which to learn.”

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