College College Trustees Order Review of All Sexual-Harassment Cases

November 9, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

The Los Angeles Community College District Board of Trustees has announced plans to tackle issues involving sexual harassment and bullying “head on” to protect the district’s employees and  students.

The board voted unanimously Nov. 1 to instruct Chancellor Francisco Rodriguez to prepare a report with a list of every complaint of sexual harassment or bullying involving employees and students in the last five years, including where each reported incident occurred, details of each report
and disposition of each complaint.

The chancellor’s report is scheduled to be delivered in 60 days.

“The information we receive will form the basis for our deliberations as we formulate new policies,” said trustee Andra Hoffman, who authored the motion calling for the report.

Hoffman said she will “continue to press for policies that will guarantee those who are targets of harassment or bullying that they can report the incidents with the knowledge that there will be full investigations, there will be appropriate responses and there will be no fear of retaliation.”

Hoffman said the trustees committed themselves to have a special presentation by an expert in the field to talk about how to deal with bullying, harassment and violence in the workplace.

“I think the time is right for us to make sure every employee and student in this district is protected against harassment of any kind and against bullying,” Hoffman said. “In recent months, I have been told of two situations that are of particular concern. One involved a charge of sexual harassment at one of our campuses and that the person making the charge was first offered a bribe to drop the charge and later was threatened if she didn’t drop the charge. The other involved what appears on the surface to be a false accusation of sexual harassment that may be intend to influence a hiring decision. I will deal with each of these specific issues separately and through other channels to make sure they are thoroughly investigated and properly dealt with.”
 

Hillary Clinton Brings Campaign to Los Angeles

May 6, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Former Secretary of State Hillary Clinton brought her campaign for the Democratic presidential nomination to Los Angeles Thursday, attending fundraisers and courting black and Latino voters by vowing to raise the national minimum wage and create jobs.

Clinton met with local black leaders during a stop at the California African American Museum in Exposition Park, where she touted her lead over her competitor, Vermont Sen. Bernie Sanders.

“I am 3 million-plus votes ahead of Senator Sanders, right?” Clinton told the crowd. “I am nearly 300 pledged delegates ahead of Senator Sanders.”

Among those in the crowd at the event were Reps. Maxine Waters and Karen Bass, both D-Los Angeles, and Los Angeles City Council President Herb Wesson.

Later in the day, she attended a boisterous rally at East Los Angeles College, where she again derided presumptive Republican presidential nominee Donald Trump as a “loose cannon” and a “risk we cannot afford.”

“Now as president, creating good jobs and raising income will be my number-one priority,” she said. “And we will follow the lead of California and raise the minimum wage.”

Clinton also vowed to guarantee equal pay for women.

“And we’re also going to follow California’s lead and make sure we have paid family leave for working families,” she said. “I will do everything I can to make the economy work for everybody, to help more people lift themselves out of poverty, lift themselves into the middle class and go as far as their hard work and talents will take them.”

Hillary Clinton supporters waited in line for hours to see her at East LA Community College. (EGP photo by Jacqueline Garcia)

Hillary Clinton supporters waited in line for hours to see her at East LA Community College. (EGP photo by Jacqueline Garcia)

At least two other presidential candidates have spoken at East Los Angeles College and gone on to be elected—John F. Kennedy in 1960 and Clinton’s husband, Bill, in 1992, according to Maria Iacobo of the Los Angeles Community College District.

Members of Union del Barrio, MEXA of East Los Angeles College, LA Brown Berets and several other student and community-based organizations held a march through Monterey Park to East Los Angeles College to protest what organizers called Clinton’s attacks on working-class communities of color and her 2002 vote as a senator in favor of the resolution authorizing military action against Iraq.

“This event is to let Hillary know that she is not welcomed in Los Angeles and to raise community awareness of what she really represents. We will let the community know that either Donald Trump or Hillary Clinton would make terrible presidents,” said organizer Ron Gochez.

People gathered outside of the ELAC auditorium to protest against Hillary Clinton. (EGP photo by Jacqueline Garcia)

People gathered outside of the ELAC auditorium to protest against Hillary Clinton. (EGP photo by Jacqueline Garcia)

hil3

(EGP photo by jacqueline García)

“This action is strictly to protest against Hillary Clinton and not in support of any party and/or candidates.”

There was no response to an email sent Wednesday night to the Clinton campaign seeking comment.

Ninio Fetalvo, spokesman for the Republican National Committee, said Clinton is faltering in her effort to win over Latino voters.

“Hillary Clinton is scrambling to win a nomination she should have locked down months ago,” he said. “Worse, the more Bernie Sanders campaigns in California, the more it looks like he will once again turn Clinton’s false Latino firewall claim on its head.”

Clinton also attended a series of fundraisers, including one at the home of City Councilman Jose Huizar, who called himself a long-time Clinton supporter.

“Hillary Clinton is by far the most qualified candidate for U.S. president who brings with her a wealth of experience, toughness, tenacity and compassion,” he said.

Tickets for the event were $2,700, the maximum individual contribution under federal law to a candidate seeking a party’s presidential nomination, according to Political Party Time, a website that tracks political fundraisers.

Both Sanders and Trump held rallies in Charleston, West Virginia, Thursday, five days before its primary.

Clinton’s Southland swing came amid news that several of her aides—including Abedin—have been interviewed by the FBI as part of an investigation into whether classified information was mishandled by Clinton’s use of a private email server as secretary of state. Clinton has denied any wrongdoing and said she would cooperate with federal investigators.

Reince Priebus, chairman of the Republican National Committee, called the FBI interviews evidence of “gross negligence” by Clinton, saying her use of a private email server was a “reckless attempt to skirt government transparency laws” that “put our national security at risk.”

Residents Worried SR-710 Light Rail Would Burden East LA

April 16, 2015 by · 8 Comments 

East Los Angeles residents fear they will once again be forced to bare the brunt of efforts to relieve traffic in the region.

They remember all too well the disruption to businesses and residents extending the Gold Line east caused in their neighborhood.

Lea este artículo en Español: SR-710 Tren Ligero Podría Ser una Carga Para el Este de Los Ángeles

Those concerns were expressed Saturday during a public hearing at East Los Angeles College hosted by Metro and Caltrans to get feedback on the State Route 710 Study.

While a majority of people who spoke at the hearing appeared to support a freeway tunnel option, several eastside residents said support in other cities for a light rail train through their neighborhood has them worried.

A map viewing at East Los Angeles College Saturday allowed residents who live along the proposed SR-710 Freeway project to view the impact on their communities. (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

A map viewing at East Los Angeles College Saturday allowed residents who live along the proposed SR-710 Freeway project to view the impact on their communities. (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

More vocal communities along the route are getting all the attention, they complained.

In March, Metro and Caltrans released a Draft Environmental Impact Report/Environmental Impact Statement (EIR/EIS), which outlined five alternatives for closing the gap between the 710 and 210 freeways. The options include a traffic management system, a rapid bus line, a light rail, a freeway tunnel and the required “no build” option.

About 100 people from Pasadena, South Pasadena, Alhambra, Monterey Park, El Sereno and East Los Angeles attended the hearing.

Many speakers supported the option to build a 2-way, 6.3 mile tunnel from Valley Boulevard in Alhambra to the connection with the 210/134 freeways in Pasadena.

The double decker option would have two lanes traveling in each direction and would run for 4.2 miles of bored tunnel. Vehicles carrying flammable or hazardous materials will be prohibited in the tunnel.

Residents from eastside communities and throughout the San Gabriel Valley spoke at the SR-710 Metro meeting, held at ELAC Saturday. (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

Residents from eastside communities and throughout the San Gabriel Valley spoke at the SR-710 Metro meeting, held at ELAC Saturday. (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

Several eastside residents claimed they “were left out of the conversation,” referring to the decision to include the Light Rail Train (LRT) alternative. They pointed out that some of the businesses hurt by construction of the Gold Line Eastside Extension in 2009 never recovered.

A light rail will destroy “one of the nicest corridors” and the East LA Civic Center on Third and Mednik Streets, they complained.

“We do not need the rail,” Martha Hernandez told Metro. “We can get to Pasadena on the Gold Line,” she said, adding that eastside residents can already get to Cal State LA by taking Metro’s Silver Line. There is also an express shuttle from ELACC.

Liz Sanchez lives one block from Mednik Street where a station could be built if a light rail is chosen. She told EGP a train would add to parking problems in her neighborhood because there’s no plan to provide public parking for rail passengers.

“I have a disability and even now it is hard to find parking… I don’t want to be selfish, but this is not a good option,” she lamented.

Clara Solis asked Metro and Caltrans to explain why East LA residents should bare the burden of other cities’ transportation problems. “Fifteen of our precious businesses that are walking distance from residences will be removed,” she said.

Yolanda Duarte, advisory chairperson for the Maravilla Community Center, said Metro 710 project spokespersons had gone to the eastside Center to give the community and businesses more information about the project.

Yolanda Duarte, an East Los Angeles resident, told Metro officials her concerns with the rail alternative. (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

Yolanda Duarte, an East Los Angeles resident, told Metro officials her concerns with the rail alternative. (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

“On two occasions questions were asked if businesses or residences will be taken, the answer [by Metro] was no. [Now] The EIR states 15 businesses will be targeted” to make room for rail stations, she said, visibly frustrated. The businesses are on Mednik, south of the I-60/at Third Street: One home and a businesses on East Cesar Chavez could also be taken.

People were able to review maps and other visual materials pertaining to the five alternatives and ask Metro engineers questions before the public hearing got under way.

Metro planners explained that if the light rail is chosen, it would travel 7.5 miles, divided into 3 miles of aerial track and 4.5 miles submerged approximately 6-stories underground.

The rail line would run from south of Valley Boulevard, with the first aerial station on Mednik Avenue adjacent to the East LA Civic Center Station, and two more aerial stations on Floral Drive and at Cal State LA. It would then go underground with stations in Alhambra, Huntington Drive, South Pasadena and to the Fillmore Station in Pasadena where it would connect with the Gold Line.

Many eastside residents have long resented Metro opting to build the Eastside Gold Line above ground while  approving preferred but costlier underground subway options for other communities.

Several people said the eastside is once again getting the short end of the stick, complaining that the proposed rail line would run above ground through East LA, but then go underground through the more affluent communities north of Cal State LA.

“Why don’t we get a tunnel” like they do in Pasadena, one speaker demanded to know.

“Take out this project, do not even consider it,” said Gilbert Hernandez.

How to fill the 4.5-mile gap between the 710’s terminus in Alhambra and the Foothill (210) Freeway in Pasadena is a debate that has raged on for more than six decades. If a route is eventually selected, a revenue source to cover the hundreds of millions, perhaps billions of dollars needed to build it would still have to be found. The project could take three to five years to complete if the light rail is chosen.

L.A. County Supervisor Hilda Solis represents East Los Angeles and other areas impacted by the SR-710. She told EGP via email it is imperative to reduce congestion, improve air quality and enhance mobility for all residents, however, she does not yet see “any option as a natural choice” due to the many pros and cons.

“For example, the light rail alternative threatens the highest number of businesses and homes while the tunnel options could become a bottomless money pit. A combination of alternatives may end up being the way to get the most for our money,” she stated, adding that her staff is studying the various options and will hold community input meetings in addition to those scheduled by Metro.

“The communities I represent deserve a solution that absolutely improves their quality of life and environment … while improving mobility and using transportation to foster economic growth,” she said.

Metro and Caltrans have scheduled two more public hearings:

—Wednesday, May 6 at La Cañada High School auditorium, with a map viewing from 5-6 p.m. and public hearing at 6 p.m.

—Thursday, May 7 at the Los Angeles Christian Presbyterian Church, map viewing 5-6 p.m. and public hearing at 6 p.m.

The full study is available at  http://www.dot.ca.gov/dist07/resources/envdocs/docs/710study/draft_eir-eis and can be viewed at the Caltrans District Office, 100 S. Main St., Los Angeles, CA 90012 and public libraries listed here:  http://www.metro.net/projects/sr- 710-conversations.

Comments will be accepted by mail through July 6: Mail to Garret Damrath, Caltrans Division 7, Division of Environmental Planning, 100 South Main Street MS-16, Los Angeles CA 90012.

To read more about the SR-710, go to www.EGPNews.com.

—-

Twitter @jackiereporter

jgarcia@egpnews.com
Updated 2;50 p.m.

New ELAC Football Coach Has Big Plans

January 15, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

East Los Angeles College will have one of the premier football programs in the state, says new Huskie Coach Eric Marty.

“I believe that East Los Angeles College, with its location and resources, can have a tremendous impact on its players, the community, and become one of top football programs in California,” says Marty, who last season was an assistant coach and the offensive coordinator at Moorpark College in Ventura County.

Though only 28-years-old, Marty’s experience as a player and coach is extensive and impressive. Prior to Moorpark, he spent two seasons at Oklahoma Panhandle State University and two years coaching offense for two separate professional teams in Europe’s Italian League. Both of his offenses finished in the top two in nearly every statistical category.

New East Los Angeles College football Coach Eric Marty is aiming to lead the Huskies to prominence by building one of the top community college programs. (Photo by Mario Villegas)

New East Los Angeles College football Coach Eric Marty is aiming to lead the Huskies to prominence by building one of the top community college programs. (Photo by Mario Villegas)

The Washington native was also a three-years starting quarterback at Chapman University in Orange where he broke six school passing records, leading the Panthers to a 14-8 record as a starter, and consecutive winning seasons for the first time since 1995-96.

“It is my vision and desire to build a program so organized, so efficient, and so purpose driven that it is able to radically transform the lives of its players,” Marty said. “And I believe that if a program can demand accountability (academically as athletes, and as men of character) that this type of transformation in its players is inevitable and that there will be a windfall of success on the field and in the classroom.”

Key to his success, said Marty, will be recruiting, player development and academic progress, focusing on the game’s X’s and O’s, and maintaining ELAC’s success transferring players to four-year universities.

“Our vision will be realized by concentrating our focus, energy, and resources

on those four core areas,” Marty said.

Before Marty’s arrival, Moorpark was a dismal 3-17 over two seasons. He not only helped rejuvenate the offense, but also the entire program, which improved enough to go 5-5 in his first season in 2013 and in 2014 his offense finished 14th in the state in total offense.

Copyright © 2017 Eastern Group Publications/EGPNews, Inc. ·