Addressing Homeless Problems in Northeast L.A.

February 26, 2015 by · 1 Comment 

Representatives of various city and county housing and mental health agencies, elected officials, law enforcement, nonprofit groups, residents and the homeless gathered Tuesday night for a town hall meeting on issues of homelessness in Northeast Los Angeles. While some complained about trash, illegal camping and public safety, others defended the rights of the homeless and called for policies that go beyond “sweeping the problem away.”

The meeting was held at Ramona Hall, a parks and recreation facility adjacent to Sycamore Grove Park on Figueroa Street.

There’s been an ongoing problem with litter and illegal dumping in the area. Residents and a local school have repeatedly complained sidewalks are being taken over by the homeless and their possessions. They fear using the park for recreational activities, despite the city on more than one occasion sending in crews to clean up the area.

Much of the discussion focused on the rights of the homeless and the need for more services to help them. Panelists answered questions about what can be done to lessen the impact on local neighborhoods like Eagle Rock, Highland Park, Montecito Heights and Cypress Park.

A representative of a housing complex demands more housing for homeless people and more efficient application process. (EGP photo by Jacqueline Garcia)

A representative of a housing complex demands more housing for homeless people and more efficient application process. (EGP photo by Jacqueline Garcia)

They were asked about the process for dealing with the seemingly ever-growing number of homeless encampments along the Arroyo Seco Parkway and in public spaces like the 200-acre Debs Park in Montecito Heights; panelists repeatedly responded that the homeless have rights too and need more services to assist them. “When you move them from one corner, they just wind up on another corner,” pointed out one of the speakers. That’s not the solution.

Someone in the audience asked why the city isn’t looking into designating campgrounds where they can live in Northeast L.A..

Senior lead officers from the LAPD’S Hollenbeck and Northeast police divisions said their goal is to not to arrest unless there is a real danger, but to try to encourage the homeless to get services; an approach shared by neighborhood prosecutors for Hollenbeck and Northeast who said they try to deescalate situations rather than prosecute the homeless.

Several panelists pointed out that many of the homeless have deep roots and ties to the neighborhoods.

“They are locals, moving out of the area is not an option for them,” said John Urquiza, a member of the Northeast Alliance.

There are not enough beds, transitional housing or wrap-around services available in the northeast area and they do not want to go to shelters in Skid Row or El Monte, speakers said. They’d rather live on the street, it’s a lifestyle said one of the speakers.

Everybody would like an apartment, countered Rebecca Prine with the Homeless Coalition and Recycled Resources, which does outreach to and collects data on the homeless in Northeast L.A.

They feel safe living along the Arroyo because at some point they were residents somewhere nearby, she said. Some of her clients have families in the area, she said.

In 2011, the Los Angeles Homeless Services Authority (LAHSA) estimated there are 68,000 homeless people in Los Angeles County. Out of those, more than 31,000 suffer of a physical or mental illness such as depression, post-traumatic stress disorder, schizophrenia, psychotic disorder, anxiety, etc. Today, there are an estimated 44,000 homeless people in Los Angeles County.

Urquiza said that Highland Park has become one of the most expensive areas to live, with rent averaging $1,800 a month. “Nobody talks about housing, they all talk about revitalization,” he said.

First District Councilman Gil Cedillo’s Field Deputy Sylvia Robledo told the audience her boss has made affordable housing one of his top priorities and on Wednesday would introduce a motion calling on the city administrator to comprehensively study how the city is using it’s $9 billion in federal funds to provide transitional housing.

The issue is complex, there is not one single solution, said Martin Schlagetev, Councilman Jose Huizar’s aid in charge of homeless issues. He discussed how the councilman’s office is working comprehensively on the issue, from cleaning streets to bringing in county social workers to work with the homeless simultaneously.

Ron is homeless and attended Tuesday’s town hall. He said the homeless feel harassed by the police and park rangers. He accused them of pushing him out of his camp and to the riverbed.

He said there are too many rules and it takes too long to get services. “Go get a TB check, go fill out a survey, do something” and you’re still waiting six months later.

Richard Renteria counsels the homeless and said most of those he’s interviewed are afraid to  live in Skid Row shelters.

“The majority of people here are one check away from being homeless and if I became homeless, I’d rather live here in the Arroyo than in the shelters that I serve,” he said.

For nearly two hours, several residents sat quietly waiting for a chance to discuss their concerns, growing increasingly frustrated, and in some cases angry, that nothing was being said about their right to feel safe in their homes and neighborhoods.

Minutes before the meeting was to end, Edward Carreon finally had a chance to speak. He said he understands homelessness cannot be addressed in one day, that more affordable housing and services for the homeless are needed, but he wants the city and police to do something to protect his and his family’s rights.

“Not all the homeless are good people like it’s been said here,” he said. A lot of them are really bad characters. They are selling and shooting up heroine, and there’s a chop shop where they sell stolen bikes. You come across them having sex in the bushes at Debbs Park, Carreon said. “I can’t even take my daughter out anymore, I don’t feel safe.”

The city needs to step up police patrols to protect residents in the area, he said, before being cut off by the meeting moderator who said they were out of time and had to adjourn.

Immediately following the meeting, several residents said they attended the meeting because they were worried about the growing number of homeless in their neighborhoods and how aggressive some have become.

Kim Hepner has lived in Montecito Heights since 2002 and said she was frustrated that people like her who had followed the rules and waited quietly to ask questions were never given a chance to speak. The meeting was all about the rights of he homeless, she said.

“What about those of us who want to use the park to exercise? There’s a big problem with obesity in this area and people need the park,” she said. “People are afraid, I can’t even walk my dog in the park anymore, she said.

“We used to have gang problems” when I first moved to Montecito Heights, but that got better. Now it’s the homeless and it’s “very unsafe out there,” she told EGP.

She said thanks to the Next Door mobile app she is able to discuss the issues with people living in her neighborhood.

“There are a lot of us on there and we talk about how we can protect each other,” she said. “We watch out for each other” and talk about the illegal homeless encampments, dumping and other illegal activities in the park, Hepner said.

Speaking after the meeting, the residents said they understand the frustration of the homeless, but someone needs to understand them and their safety concerns.

Officer Craig Orange with the Los Angeles Police Department Northeast division told the audience that it is not a crime to be homeless, but more resources are needed to address the issue. “We can’t assume that just clean ups are the solution, or mental health help or housing, it is a combination of all” these things, he said.

 

EGP Editor Gloria Alvarez contributed to this story.

Housing Center Stage at Eastside Debate

February 12, 2015 by · 1 Comment 

Boyle Heights City Hall was packed Saturday for the first of several debates between candidates vying for the 14th district council seat in Los Angeles.

Four of the five candidates – incumbent Councilman Jose Huizar, former L.A. County Supervisor Gloria Molina, social worker Nadine Diaz and community activist Mario Chavez – took part in the forum hosted by Boyle Heights Beat, a bilingual newspaper written by local high school students. Political consultant John O’Neill did not take part.

Despite being more ethnically and economically diverse today due to redistricting, the eastside council district — which also encompasses much of downtown L.A. and northeast neighborhoods such as Highland Park and Eagle Rock — is one of the most coveted seats among Latino politicians who see it as the heart of the Chicano movement and Latino empowerment. It is also tends to be among the most competitive races in the city, this year being no exception.

(Left to right): Jose Huizar, Nadine Diaz, Mario Chavez and Gloria Molina during a candidate debate Saturday. (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

(Left to right): Jose Huizar, Nadine Diaz, Mario Chavez and Gloria Molina during a candidate debate Saturday. (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

On Saturday, the focus was on Boyle Heights, one of the city’s most densely populated neighborhoods where 94% of residents are Latino – 54% of them foreign born. Approximately 75% of the area’s working-class residents rent rather than own their own homes and the median income is $20,000 less a year than the median income citywide. Boyle Heights is also a stronghold for political activism on issues ranging from pollution to education.

As expected, the forum focused on hot button issues such as housing and gentrification, legalization of street venders, immigration, sidewalk repair, city services like trash pick up.

Molina, who spent 24 years as a county supervisor before being forced out by term limits, taking a jab at Huizar, said she’s running because the district needs a council member who pays more attention to the eastside and is willing to work on basic issues such as fixing sidewalks and cleaning up trash and abandoned furniture.

“You need to be a leader from day one”…not only when elections are approaching, she said.

Lea este artículo en Español: Vivienda es Tema de Prioridad en Debate de Candidatos en Boyle Heights

Huizar is seeking his third and final four-year term and countered Molina’s accusation saying his Clean Communities Initiative is improving conditions and that his office has secured millions of dollars in improvements to local park facilities, for fixing streets and sidewalks and to create more affordable, veteran and senior housing. He also touted the opening of the area’s first WorkSource Center to help residents improve job skills and find employment. He doesn’t think there’s been a time in Boyle Heights history that has seen so many improvements, he said.

The debate repeatedly turned to housing issues. The neighborhoods close proximity to downtown L.A. has made it a prime target of developers, which some people fear could make Boyle Heights unaffordable for its low-income residents.

One of the more controversial housing issues in recent history is the proposed Wyvernwood Garden Apartment complex mixed-use redevelopment project, which would demolish and replace 1,187 World War II era apartment units, located on 70 acres just off East Olympic Boulevard, with 4,400 rental units and condominiums in several new buildings as tall as 18 stories.

Support in the community has been mixed, with some seeing the project as a move to force out low-income families and others contending the project will create needed housing and jobs.

On Saturday, Huizar reiterated that he believes the project as currently proposed is too dense for the area and that the area’s aging infrastructure cannot support such a big development. Twice he pushed Molina to take a position on the issue.

While she did not answer the question directly, Molina did say she believes there are already too many renters in the area. “We need to have more homeowners” in Boyle Heights, she said. “We shouldn’t allow developers to [just] do their projects.”

Residents question candidates running for Los Angeles city council during a forum at Boyle Heights City Hall.  (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

Residents question candidates running for Los Angeles city council during a forum at Boyle Heights City Hall. (EGP photo by Nancy Martinez)

Diaz agreed that housing is a critical issue and said the community should have a say in local developments. She said Wyvernwood residents should have “a place at the table.” She said the Red Line (which later became the Gold Line Eastside Extension) “pushed out families.” That cannot happen again, said the Boyle Heights resident. “We have the right to stay and remain…”

Chavez said greater community participation requires making meetings and hearings more accessible to residents. He said meetings of the city council’s affordable housing commission were held Wednesdays at 12 pm, making them inconvenient for working-class residents, thereby excluding them from having a say. “Gentrification is taking out the poor by the rich people,” Chavez said.

When the topic turned to crime, Huizar said Boyle Heights’ crime rate the lowest it’s been in many years, giving credit to Los Angeles police and more programs to help keep young people out of trouble.

More still needs to be done, retorted Molina. “We need to remove graffiti and tagging within 48 hours, we need a more aggressive position from the council,” she said.

Chavez said a tagger is a “frustrated artist that doesn’t have the resources” and more youth programs are needed. “We need to increase the funding for our youth services,” he said.

In regards to job creation, Molina said she supports efforts to revitalize business in areas zoned for commercial activity. She said allowing people to just set up “barbecue tables in front of their house” and start selling is the wrong approach. “We need to respect” residential zoning, she said.

Huizar said the Los Angeles Business Center has helped new businesses like La 1st Street Taqueria and La Monarca Bakery get the resources and financial help they needed to open near Mariachi Plaza in Boyle Heights. CD-14 is encouraging the growth of local businesses, Huizar said.

Following the forum, several attendees told EGP they were for the most part satisfied with what they heard and hope whoever is elected March 3 pays close attention to the issues in their neighborhood.

“We want the next generation to have opportunities to succeed,” said Concepcion Hernandez, pointing out that after graduating from college his son returned to Boyle Heights to teach.

Juaquin Castellanos felt the forum was informative but said he would have liked to hear more details about how the candidates would improve services in the eastside neighborhood.

He said the candidates should start thinking about creating more resources for young, educated Boyle Heights natives who want to return to the community, but want better housing options such as new condominiums.

The candidates were scheduled to face off again last night in downtown L.A. A third debate is scheduled to take place at 6 p.m. tonight in Highland Park at Luther Burbank Middle School and another at 6 p.m. Friday at the El Sereno Senior Center.

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Twitter @jackieguzman

jgarcia@egpnews.com

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