Homeland Security Defends Immigration Raids, Arrests

February 16, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

U.S. Homeland Security Secretary John Kelly Monday defended recent “targeted enforcement operations” by federal authorities in areas including Los Angeles that triggered mass-deportation fears in some immigrant communities, saying the raids were aimed at criminals and people who violated immigration laws.

On Tuesday, however, a scheduled meeting between House Members and the leadership of U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) was abruptly cancelled, adding to concerns about ICE’s willingness to be transparent.

“Frankly, ICE’s failure to meet and provide us with important information regarding ICE’s recent wave of arrests raises serious questions about the transparency of the agency’s activities,” Congresswoman Lucille Roybal-Allard (CA-40) said Tuesday.

The wave of arrests last week “created fear and panic in our communities,” she said, adding that ICE has a responsibility to answer House Members’ questions and to provide a “clear and full accounting” of their actions.

“Our constituents worry about what these arrests could mean for them, their families, and their friends,” Roybal-Allard said.

Congresswoman Grace Napolitano (CA-32), however, said Wednesday she has since spoken to a person “high up” in the agency who she did not name, and she is confident the agency had targeted some very bad criminals.

She said the agency assured her that all the actions were directed at individuals in their homes, and that the agency does not conduct raids at churches or other public locations.

According to immigration authorities, about 161 people were detained in the weeklong Southern California operation: 95 people were arrested in Los Angeles County; 35 in Orange County; 13 in San Bernardino County; seven in Riverside County; six in Ventura County and five in Santa Barbara County.

The city of Los Angeles saw the most arrests, with 37 (including nine in Van Nuys), followed by Santa Ana with 16 and Compton with six. The others were scattered around the Southland, with most cities seeing between one and four people arrested.

Similar operations were conducted across the country, with more than 680 people arrested, according to federal authorities.

News of the raids prompted an outcry from local immigrant-rights activists, with hundreds of people on Thursday taking their protest to the federal building in downtown L.A.

Activists suggested the raids are the result of President Trump’s pledge and executive action to crack down on illegal immigration and to deport people living in the United States without authorization.

In response, CHIRLA, the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights created a toll-free hotline — (888) 624-4752 — for affected immigrants to call for assistance and obtain access to attorneys. The group also began offering hourly training sessions to inform illegal immigrants about their legal rights.

On Friday, after first denying the claims of immigrant-rights activists that as many as 100 people had been arrested, immigration authorities finally acknowledged the enforcement “surge,” but said they were “no different than the routine, targeted arrests carried out by ICE’s Fugitive Operations Teams on a daily basis.” They said the raids had been in the planning for months and were in compliance with enforcement objectives set by the Obama Administration.

ICE officials insisted, however, “The rash of recent reports about purported ICE checkpoints and random sweeps are false, dangerous and irresponsible,” referring to reports circulating on social media.

“These reports create panic and put communities and law enforcement personnel in unnecessary danger. Individuals who falsely report such activities are doing a disservice to those they claim to support,” said ICE officials.

On Monday, Kelly also stressed that ICE conducts such operations “regularly and has for many years.”

“These operations targeted public safety threats, such as convicted criminal aliens and gang members, as well as individuals who have violated our nation’s immigration laws, including those who illegally re-entered the country after being removed and immigration fugitives ordered removed by federal immigration judges.”

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He said about 75 percent of the people arrested had been “convicted of crimes including, but not limited to, homicide, aggravated sexual assault, sexual assault of a minor, lewd and lascivious acts with a child, indecent liberties with a minor, drug trafficking, battery, assault, DUI and weapons charges.”

Kelly noted that Pres. Trump “has been clear in affirming the critical mission of DHS in protecting the nation and directed our department to focus on removing illegal aliens who have violated our immigration laws, with a specific focus on those who pose a threat to public safety, have been charged with criminal offenses, have committed immigration violations or have been deported and re-entered our country illegally.”

ICE, acknowledged, however, that during some raids, officers “frequently encounter additional suspects who may be in the United States in violation of the federal immigration laws. Those persons will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and, when appropriate, arrested by ICE.”

The bulk of those arrested were from Mexico, while others hailed from countries including El Salvador, Guatemala, China, Nicaragua, Jamaica, Honduras, Belize, Philippines, Australia, Brazil, Israel and South Korea.

CHIRLA and others rebuffed ICE’s label of “criminal” applied to 150 out of the more than 160 undocumented immigrants detained.

“There is a deficit of trust of DHS officials who insisted for hours on hours that nothing out of the ordinary had taken place in Southern California during the past few days,” said Angelica Salas, executive director of CHIRLA last Friday. “ICE has not been forthright with the community, attorneys, and organizations about their actions … They have only offered half-truths thus far. Forgive us then, if we must take their word with a grain of salt.”

Some elected officials also criticized the immigration actions, and pledged to provide support to immigrants, and ensure they are aware of their rights.

“President Trump has already ignited widespread fear and confusion in our immigrant communities with his executive order and divisive campaign rhetoric,” said Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. “If the reports are accurate, these raids only add to the anxiety about what’s to come from this administration.”

Roybal-Allard said she was “outraged” at news of the recent raids and suggested that some people who were targeted had no violent or criminal history.

“It is essential that Members of Congress know the facts about these enforcement activities in order to properly inform our constituents, who deserve truth and transparency from ICE,” said Roybal-Allard, who also said she is “extremely disappointed and concerned that DHS canceled” Tuesday’s meeting with Members of Congress.

“I urge Acting Director Homan to meet with my colleagues and me immediately. This meeting will enable us to share our concerns and have our questions answered to better respond to our constituents.”

 

Article contains information from City News Service.

 

No Plans to Assist ICE by Police in Southeast Cities

February 16, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) officers descended on a number of Southern California communities last week, spreading fear that mass-deportations were underway across Los Angeles County, home to nearly 1 million undocumented immigrants.

Rumors of local police cooperating with ICE officers spread quickly, especially in working class, immigrant communities where distrust of police is in some cases already high.

Since 2014, the California Trust Act has prohibited local jails from holding people under arrest for longer periods than charges require just to give ICE more time to decide whether to take the person into custody.

The two largest law enforcement agencies in the region, the Los Angeles County Sheriff’s Department and the Los Angeles Police Dept., have both said they will not act as “immigration agents” or cooperate with federal immigration officers.

Smaller police forces, many in cities with large numbers immigrant residents or in the case of Vernon, workers, also say they want to leave immigration enforcement to federal authorities.

Vernon Police Chief Daniel Calleros told EGP he was surprised to hear that one of last week’s raids took place in nearby Downey. He said the Vernon Police Department has no plans to assist ICE with such raids or to detain people in the country without authorization until ICE can take them into custody.

“We don’t work hand-in-hand with ICE,” Calleros emphasized. “We don’t hold anyone on ICE detainers, only actual warrants signed by a judge.”

Calleros said immigration issues are not an area the city gets involved in.

“We don’t ask if you are here illegally, that’s not our job,” he explained, saying it’s the job of the federal government.

He added that Vernon Police would only assist ICE if it were a matter of public safety.

In neighboring Bell Gardens, police Chief Robert E. Barnes also told EGP his department does not get involved in immigration-related matters.

He clarified, however, that some Bell Gardens PD detectives work with ICE agents as part of the Los Angeles Interagency Metropolitan Police Apprehension Crime Task Force (L.A. IMPACT), which investigates major narcotic crimes.

EGP was unable to verify whether the LA IMPACT task force assisted in ICE raids last week,

Barnes acknowledged that some of past mistrust of Bell Gardens police might still linger in the working class, predominately Latino southeast city.

“We used to have issues with DUI Checkpoints,” he said, recalling that some people believed the checkpoints were really a pretense for checking a person’s immigration status.

But “that’s not even on our radar” these days, Barnes said.

When asked about the Montebello Police Department’s stance on immigration during the city’s first-ever virtual neighborhood watch meeting last week, Sgt. Marc Marty said a person’s immigration status does not change anything.

“When someone commits a crime, whether or not you’re an [undocumented] immigrant or citizen, we arrest you,” he said. “We arrest people based on the violation of the law and let the courts decide what to do with them.”

Nearby Commerce contracts with the LA County Sheriff’s Department for its policing services, and therefore falls under that department’s guidelines when it comes to immigration enforcement.

Sheriff Jim McDonnell has on numerous occasions sought to assure immigrants that the LA County Sheriff Department is committed to helping all people regardless of their immigration status. He’s emphasized that deputies do not participate in the process of determining the immigration status of people in their custody, or that of crime victims.

Both Calleros and Barnes told EGP they have not received any calls related to the raids from residents or businesses in their respective cities, despite rumors of local police in some areas assisting in immigration checkpoints that have since been discredited.

Both police chiefs did say however, there is one phone call they hope to get should ICE decide to conduct similar operations in Bell Gardens or Vernon.

“I hope that if they do come into our city they give us a courtesy call so we have an idea of what’s going on,” said Calleros.

 

California: Estado Más Afectado Por Redadas de la Semana Pasada

February 16, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

California fue el estado más afectado por los operativos de la semana pasada que se saldaron con el arresto de más de 680 inmigrantes en todo el país en la primera tanda de redadas de la presidencia de Donald Trump, como informó el Gobierno el 13 de febrero.

Los agentes de inmigración detuvieron la semana pasada a 680 inmigrantes, informó el Gobierno, que defendió que las operaciones se centraron en individuos que supusieran “amenazas a la seguridad pública”.

El secretario de Seguridad Nacional de EE.UU., John Kelly, dio la cifra de detenidos en un comunicado, y subrayó que “aproximadamente el 75 por ciento” de los 680 eran “inmigrantes criminales”.

Según cifras difundidas por el Servicio de Inmigración y Aduanas (ICE) el mismo día, en Los Ángeles 161 personas fueron arrestadas y casi la mayoría (un cuarto del total) vivían en el Sur de California.

Los mismos datos indican que 235 de los detenidos se encontraban en los estados de Illinois, Indiana, Wisconsin, Kentucky, Kansas y Misuri; mientras otros 190 fueron detenidos en Georgia, Carolina del Norte o Carolina del Sur.

También, otros 41 fueron arrestados en Nueva York y 28 más los detuvieron en el área de San Antonio (Texas), precisó ICE.

En el Condado de Los Ángeles, las autoridades migratorias arrestaron a 95 personas, la mayoría dentro de sus hogares. Mientras que en el Condado de Orange, según aseguran los activistas, los agentes del ICE incluso llegaron a entrar a una fábrica donde trabajaba uno de los 35 arrestados en esa zona.

La ciudad de Los Ángeles vio la mayoría de los arrestos con 28 detenidos, seguido por Santa Ana con 16, y Van Nuys con nueve indocumentados arrestados.

42 de los inmigrantes detenidos tenían condenas por violencia doméstica, 26 tenían cargos relacionados con drogas, y 17 por delitos sexuales.

Solo 10 indocumentados del total de los arrestados no tenían récord criminal.

Las acciones migratorias comenzaron el lunes de la semana pasada y se extendieron el jueves a Los Ángeles. A respuesta, la Coalición por los Derechos Humanos de los Inmigrantes en Los Ángeles (CHIRLA) está ofreciendo sesiones de capacitación tituladas “Conozca Sus Derechos” y una línea de información gratuita (888-624-4752) para personas que necesiten asistencia legal.

Entre los 680 detenidos de la semana pasada, en su mayoría (90%) hombres, había inmigrantes originarios de una docena de países, liderados por mexicanos.

Los otros arrestados eran de países como El Salvador, Guatemala, China, Nicaragua, Jamaica, Honduras, Belice, Filipinas, Australia, Brasil, Israel y Corea del Sur.

De momento, el titular de Seguridad Nacional no precisó cuántos de los inmigrantes detenidos han sido o serán deportados y cuántos de ellos se enfrentarán a procesos penales en Estados Unidos.

Joven Beneficiario de DACA Detenido por Inmigración

February 16, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Agentes migratorios de Estados Unidos detuvieron a un joven indocumentado de 23 años que estaba amparado por un programa del expresidente Barack Obama para los inmigrantes que llegaron de niños al país, a los que se conoce como “dreamers” (“soñadores”).

El caso de Daniel Ramírez Medina es el primero conocido en EE.UU. de la detención de un “dreamer” tras la llegada al poder del nuevo presidente, Donald Trump.

Los “dreamers” son los jóvenes que se beneficiaron del programa de alivio migratorio Acción Diferida (DACA) aprobado en 2012 por Obama y al que se acogieron unos 750,000 indocumentados que llegaron de niños al país.

Trump prometió durante la campaña que los “dreamers” serían deportados igual que el resto de indocumentados que viven en el país (unos 11 millones), pero hace un par de semanas afirmó que “no deberían preocuparse mucho” porque tiene “un gran corazón”.

Ramírez Medina, de nacionalidad mexicana y que llegó a Estados Unidos en 2001 cuando tenía siete años, fue detenido el pasado viernes en la residencia familiar de Des Moines (estado de Washington), según denunció su defensa el 14 de febrero.

El joven, que se acogió al programa DACA en 2014, carece de antecedentes y fue detenido cuando los agentes del Servicio de Inmigración y Aduanas (ICE) procedían a detener a su padre por motivos que no han trascendido.

De acuerdo con un comunicado del ICE dirigido a Univisión, Ramírez Medina es un “riesgo para la seguridad pública” ya que reconoció “estar afiliado con pandillas”.

“El señor Ramírez -quien admitió ser miembro de una pandilla- fue hallado en una residencia en Des Moines, Washington, durante una operación que tenía como objetivo a un delincuente que ya había sido deportado anteriormente”, apuntó el ICE.

La defensa del joven, sin embargo, negó categóricamente que forme parte de pandilla alguna y denunció que los agentes le obligaron a confesarlo una vez detenido.

ICE detuvo la semana pasada a 680 inmigrantes indocumentados en varias redadas en una docena de estados.

Activists Challenge ICE Claim that Raids Targeted Criminals

February 10, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Federal immigration authorities confirmed today they arrested about 160 foreign nationals in a series of Southland raids carried out over the past week targeting “criminal aliens” and others in the country illegally, but activists and some elected officials criticized the actions and questioned ICE’s assertion that the raids have been months in the planning and are business as usual.

“For ICE, the arrest, detention, and deportation of more than 160 members of our community is business as usual. It is not for us and we will fight tooth and nail to stop them,” said Angelica Salas, executive director of CHIRLA, the Coalition for Humane Immigrant Rights.

According to U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement, the raids were carried out in six Southern California counties beginning Monday and ending around noon Friday. The operations targeted “at-large criminal aliens, illegal re-entrants and immigration fugitives.”

The raids prompted an outcry that began Thursday afternoon from local immigrant-rights activists, who suggested the actions were a result of a stepped-up enforcement effort under the Donald Trump presidential administration, which has vowed to crack down on illegal immigrations and people living in the United States without authorization.

CHIRLA created a toll-free hotline — (888) 624-4752 — for affected immigrants to call for assistance and obtain access to attorneys. The group also began offering hourly training sessions to inform illegal immigrants about their legal rights.

One woman, Marlene Mosqueda, told reporters Friday morning her father was taken away Thursday by authorities who weren’t wearing clothing identifying them as ICE officers, and he was deported.

“They took my parents away,” she said. “They took my family away.”

ICE officials initially insisted, however, “The rash of recent reports about purported ICE checkpoints and random sweeps are false, dangerous and irresponsible.

“These reports create panic and put communities and law enforcement personnel in unnecessary danger. Individuals who falsely report such activities are doing a disservice to those they claim to support,” according to ICE officials.

While the raids represented an enforcement “surge,” they were “no different than the routing, targeted arrests carried out by ICE’s Fugitive Operations Teams on a daily basis,” they said, saying Friday that the raids had been in the planning for months and were in compliance with enforcement objectives set by the Obama Administration.

ICE officials said about 150 of the people arrested had criminal histories, while five others had “final orders of removal or had been previously deported.” They noted that many of those arrested had prior felony convictions for violent offenses including sex crimes, weapons charges and assault, and some will be referred to the U.S. Attorney’s Office for possible prosecution for re-entering the country illegally.

Details were not provided on the remaining people arrested, but ICE noted that during some raids, officers “frequently encounter additional suspects who may be in the United States in violation of the federal immigration laws. Those persons will be evaluated on a case-by-case basis and, when appropriate, arrested by ICE.”

CHIRLA and others rebuffed ICE’s label of “criminal” applied to 150 out of more than 160 undocumented immigrants it finally admitted Friday to have detained in their most recent sweep in Southern California.

“There is a deficit of trust on DHS officials who insisted for hours on hours that nothing out of the ordinary had taken place in Southern California during the past few days,” said Salas. “ICE has not been forthright with the community, attorneys, and organizations about their actions this week. They have only offered half-truths thus far. Forgive us then, if we must take their word with a grain of salt.”

Some elected officials also criticized the immigration actions, and pledged to provide support to immigrants, and ensure they are aware of their rights.

“President Trump has already ignited widespread fear and confusion in our immigrant communities with his executive order and divisive campaign rhetoric,” said Sen. Dianne Feinstein, D-Calif. “If the reports are accurate, these raids only add to the anxiety about what’s to come from this administration.”

Rep. Lucille Roybal-Allard, D-Los Angeles, said she was “outraged” at news of the recent raids and suggested that some people who were targeted had no violent or criminal history.

“I am working with my constituents and the immigrant community to ensure they know their rights,” she said. “As this process moves forward, I will also ensure my constituents know what the next steps are, where applicable.”

ICE officials said the five-day operation included:
— the Huntington Park arrest of a Salvadoran national gang member
wanted in his home country for aggravated extortion;
— the Los Angeles arrest of a Brazilian national wanted in Brazil for
cocaine trafficking; and
— the West Hollywood arrest of an Australian national previously
convicted of lewd acts with a child.

“We demand ICE stop these sweeps which cause terror and instability in the community,” Salas said. “Furthermore, we demand ICE explain exactly what crime did the other 147 immigrants commit to merit the label “criminal.” Providing three examples does not a whole group of people a criminal make.

Article includes information from City News Service.

Trump Will Get No Help Deporting Immigrants from LAPD, Says Police Chief

November 17, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

The Los Angeles Police Department will not actively help federal officials apprehend immigrants who are in the country illegally and are “low-level offenders,” even in the face of President-elect Donald Trump’s plans to deport up to 3 million immigrants who have committed crimes, Police Chief Charlie Beck said Tuesday.

The department will still cooperate with federal officials if the immigrant in custody has committed a “serious violent crime,” Beck told reporters at City Hall.

But “the use of local law enforcement for general deportation reasons for low-level offenders is not appropriate,” he said.

While not fitting the typical definition of a “sanctuary city” that shields undocumented immigrants from federal officials, Los Angeles has long had a policy of keeping local police work separate from that of federal immigration officials.

Beck said that as a local law enforcement agency, the police department’s primary goal is to ensure the safety of Angelenos, which depends on officers being trusted by the immigrant community.

“Over 500,000 Angelenos, people who live in Los Angeles, are undocumented immigrants,” Beck said. “I need their cooperation. I need them to work with their local police stations. I need them to be witnesses to violent crime. I need them to be part of the fabric of Los Angeles if we are to
keep this city safe.”

“For a local law enforcement agency to take on the role of immigration enforcement tears that fabric apart,” he said.

Beck said the department will keep people in custody no longer than the typical 48 to 72 hours, and will not honor requests by U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement officials to detain people longer than that.

Beck said the department takes the position that these types of “ICE detainers have been shown to be illegal.”

The police department, however, will not hide the fact that an undocumented immigrant has been taken into custody, according to Beck.

Beck said the “system by which we run folks nationally for warrants notifies ICE automatically,” so they will still release people to immigration enforcement officials as long as they are in their custody, Beck said.

“If they (ICE officials) call, if they make contact, then we give them the release dates, but we don’t hold people past those release dates,” he said. “And if they bail out, they bail out.”

He said that while it would be a “big deal” if the department’s stance were to result in the city losing out on federal dollars, it will not influence whether he does “the right thing.”

“It’s a matter of principle,” he said. “This is a matter of what … is the core value of the Los Angeles Police Department, which I believe far transcends any other motivation.”

ICE Agents Back in L.A. County Jails

September 24, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

Federal immigration agents have returned to Los Angeles County jails to seek out deportable inmates under a new policy by Sheriff Jim McDonnell that has prompted criticism from immigrant advocates who say it could lead to racial profiling, it was reported Wednesday.

The new Sheriff’s Department policy comes after county lawmakers voted this year to end a controversial program that allowed Immigration and Customs Enforcement agents to work inside the jails to assess the immigration status of inmates.

Now ICE agents are being allowed back inside, but only to interview inmates who have committed serious crimes and are not protected by the California Trust Act, the Los Angeles Times reported in an article posted on its website this morning. That 2013 law limits when local law enforcement officials can collaborate with federal immigration authorities.

Under the new policy, jail officials will also notify ICE up to seven days before those inmates are being released so immigration agents can pick them up and initiate deportation proceedings. The new procedures stand in contrast to those in San Francisco, where lawmakers have banned all sheriff collaboration with immigration officials except when federal authorities have a court order or a warrant.

San Francisco’s policies have been in a spotlight since the July shooting death of a woman on a busy pier, allegedly by a man in the country illegally who had recently been released from local custody. The incident sparked an outcry. Figures as varied as Democratic Sen. Dianne Feinstein and

Republican presidential candidate Donald Trump called for closer collaboration between local police and ICE.

Immigrant advocates, who say such collaboration leads to racial profiling and sows distrust in law enforcement among immigrant communities, say L.A. County’s new policy is a reaction to that pressure, The Times reported.

Junta de Supervisores Finaliza Programa de ICE Pero Permite Uno Similar

May 18, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

 

La Junta de Supervisores del Condado votó el martes para terminar un acuerdo que permite que agentes federales de inmigración entren a las cárceles del condado y que algunos empleados de la cárcel actúen como representantes de agentes de inmigración, pero le pidieron al alguacil Jim McDonnell que continúe cooperando con el Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas de EE.UU. (ICE por sus siglas en inglés), causando nuevas preguntas sobre las políticas del condado.

Los supervisores Hilda Solís y Mark Ridley-Thomas recomendaron que el Departamento del Condado de Los Ángeles consulte con organizaciones comunitarias y reevalúe sus relaciones con la oficina del ICE en los siguientes 90 días.

“Veo esto como una oportunidad para avanzar puesto que tenemos un nuevo alguacil. Tenemos una nueva junta”, dijo Solís.

La supervisora Sheila Kuehl también votó para apoyar la eliminación del acuerdo del 2014, mientras que los supervisores Michael Antonovich y Don Knabe disintieron sus votos.

Aunque el acuerdo existente—conocido como Comunidades Seguras y a menudo referido en corto como 287 (g)—será anulado, la junta le pidió a McDonnell que “continúe cooperando con el Departamento de Seguridad Nacional de EE.UU. para implementar el Programa de Ejecución de Prioridad del presidente (PEP)”.

El segundo voto fue 4-1, con Khuel disintiendo. Ella y muchos activistas comunitarios dijeron que ven poca diferencia entre los dos programas.

“Es una distinción sin diferencia”, dijo Kuehl, con los agentes de ICE esperando afuera de las cárceles para un “amable traspaso” en lugar de trabajar dentro de la cárcel.

“Es un día extraño cuando la Junta de Supervisores del Condado toman un paso adelante y tres pasos hacia atrás en inmigración”, dijo Angélica Salas, directora ejecutiva de la Coalición Pro-Inmigrante de Derechos Humanos de Los Ángeles. “Con los votos de hoy [martes], la Junta ha cerrado las puertas ante una red de deportación, pero ha dejado una ventana para permitir que el programa PEP lo remplace”.

Otros, incluyendo a la activista pro derechos civiles Dolores Huerta desacordaron.

“Terminar este programa es un enorme, gran paso para tratar a nuestros inmigrantes de la manera correcta”, Huerta le dijo a la Junta.

Mientras tanto, McDonnell, quien no llegó a la audiencia,  no ha acordado explícitamente en remover a los agentes de ICE del centro de detención en la Facilidad Correccional conocida como Twin Towers, aunque Solis y el abogado del condado dijeron que creen que lo hará.

En un comunicado el lunes, McDonnell pidió un balance de seguridad pública con confianza comunitaria.

“Nuestro departamento debe trabajar de cerca y cooperar con las autoridades federales para identificar y asistir con la completa investigación y persecución de personas indocumentadas que pueden poseer un peligro para nuestra comunidad”, dijo el alguacil. “Tambien debemos tener en mente en todo momento la importancia de servir ante las relaciones de la comunidad al igual que el proceso de aquellos que están en nuestra custodia”.

Oficiales federales anunciaron en noviembre que las Comunidades Seguras serían descontinuadas a favor de PEP.

En un comunicado dirigido al entonces director de ICE Thomas Winkowski, el Secretario de DHS Jeh Johnson dijo que el acuerdo Comunidades Seguras “es ampliamente malentendido y un litigio enredado; su mismo nombre ha sido un símbolo general de hostilidad ante la ejecución de nuestras leyes de inmigración”.

En su moción, Solís y Ridley-Thomas dijeron que el condado debería “confiar pero verificar” en cuanto a PEP.

El Programa de Ejecución Prioritaria todavía usa datos de huellas digitales de los arrestos locales para revisar el estado de inmigración de la persona, en cuanto se están enlistando en lugar de cuando se están liberando.

La información de más presos es compartida con ICE bajo el programa PEP, el alguacil Eric Parra le dijo a la Junta.

Sin embargo, solo los inmigrantes indocumentados que poseen un “riesgo visible a la seguridad nacional” o quienes han sido convictos de, no solo arrestados por, algunos crimenes son el blanco para la deportación bajo las nuevas reglas.

La lista no incluye los delitos relacionados únicamente con la inmigración ilegal. Sin embargo, sí incluye todas las felonías, delitos graves, condenas de tres o más delitos menores o de un solo “delito menor significativo,” incluyendo violencia doméstica, abuso sexual, robo, posesión ilegal de un arma de fuego, la distribución de drogas, conducir bajo la influencia del alcohol o las drogas o

cualquier condena con una pena de al menos 90 días.

Según la Ley de TRUST California, la cual entró en vigor el año pasado en un esfuerzo para proteger el derecho de los reclusos a un debido proceso, los presos no deben ser detenidos más allá del final de la fecha de su libertad programada. En su lugar, el ICE es notificado en avance de la libertad de reclusos.

Activistas comunitarios dijeron que la colaboración con el ICE socava la confianza de la comunidad y separa a las familias.

Los familiares de víctimas y asesinados por inmigrantes indocumentados hicieron súplicas emocionales para la ejecución de la 287 (g), reprendiendo a la Junta por no priorizar a ciudadanos sobre aquellos en el país ilegalmente.

El Departamento del Alguacil tiene margen de maniobra para actuar por su cuenta sin aprobación de la junta.

“ El alguacil tiene un control completo sobre las cárceles y todo el mundo en ellos”,  el abogado del condado Marcos Saladino le dijo a la Junta Directiva.

Junta de Supervisores Aplaza Decisión Sobre Acuerdo entre ICE y Autoridades Locales

October 2, 2014 by · Leave a Comment 

En lo que fue calificado por activistas a favor de los inmigrantes como una “maniobra de dilación”, la Junta de Supervisores de Los Ángeles aplazó el martes una decisión sobre la renovación de un acuerdo entre el Servicio de Inmigración y Control de Aduanas (ICE) y las autoridades locales, para compartir información sobre detenidos que puedan ser indocumentados.

La propuesta de continuación del acuerdo denominado Programa 287(g), por una enmienda de 1996 a la ley de inmigración, es el resultado de las modificaciones aplicadas a un proyecto presentado en marzo por el entonces alguacil del condado, Lee Baca.

“Consideramos que el aplazamiento de hoy es una maniobra para tener más tiempo para, supuestamente estudiar la medida, pero lo vemos como una forma de demorar la decisión”, declaró en entrevista con Efe Joseph Villela, director de Defensoría y Política de la Coalición por los Derechos Humanos de los Inmigrantes (CHIRLA) de Los Ángeles.

“Hay varios Supervisores que ya no van estar en el futuro próximo y nos preocupa el tipo de legado que van a dejar al renovar este acuerdo con el ICE”, agregó. ??Según argumentó el activista, el Programa 287(g) ha sido desacreditado por varios estudios nacionales sobre todo en el logro de los objetivos por el cual fue creado, aunque cuenta con el apoyo de la mayoría de los cinco Supervisores de Los Ángeles.

Un estudio presentado este mes por los profesores Adam Cox and Thomas J. Miles, de las facultades de leyes de las universidades de Nueva York y de Chicago, concluyó que los delitos locales no han disminuido como consecuencia de la aplicación de programas de deportación de delincuentes.

El estudio destacó que programas como el 287(g) y el “Comunidades seguras”, que ha sido calificado como más efectivo que el 287(g), no han tenido una incidencia importante con relación a la delincuencia.

“Nuestros resultados muestran que ‘Comunidades seguras’ no ha conducido a ninguna reducción significativa según el índice de delincuencia del FBI”, aseguraron los autores que analizaron las cifras de delincuencia y deportaciones de más de 3000 condados del país durante nueve años.

Mediante el Programa 287(g), el Departamento de Seguridad Nacional (DHS) busca el apoyo de agencias locales de control de la ley para utilizarlos como “multiplicadores de la fuerza”, para identificar a los inmigrantes indocumentados que han cometido delitos graves en el país.

Mediante el Memorando de Entendimiento que actualmente rige entre el alguacil del condado de Los Ángeles y el ICE, las autoridades locales son entrenadas por agentes federales de inmigración para examinar los archivos de los detenidos.

Si encuentran que un preso es un inmigrante indocumentado, se informa a las autoridades de inmigración para que lo capturen al momento de salir de la cárcel local.?? La iniciativa no incluye al Departamento de Policía de Los Ángeles que expresamente manifestó que no realizará funciones de inmigración correspondientes a las autoridades federales.

Se espera que para la elección de noviembre del nuevo alguacil de Los Ángeles, esta dependencia continúe aplicando el acuerdo de colaboración con las autoridades de inmigración.?? El candidato con más opción a ganar la elección, el comandante Jim McDonnell, actual jefe del Departamento de Policía de Long Beach, se ha manifestado a favor de continuar con el acuerdo de colaboración entre el alguacil y el ICE.

El análisis de Cox y Miles concluyó que sólo el 29 % de los deportados bajo el programa calificaban dentro de las categorías más graves de criminales condenados.

En California actualmente sólo dos condados, Los Ángeles y Orange, están utilizando el acuerdo establecido por el Programa 287(g).?? Los condados de San Bernardino y Riverside decidieron recientemente no renovar el programa que únicamente está siendo aplicado por 35 condados del país.

“En Los Ángeles no hay un sistema para reportar los tipos de delitos por los que las personas están siendo deportadas y así no hay ninguna base de datos que permita comprobar que ‘se está deportando lo peor de lo peor’, como argumenta el programa”, concluyó Villela.

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