Remains Found at Scene of Mt. Washington Fire

January 26, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

A demolition contractor notified authorities Wednesday of the discovery of what are believed to be human remains at the scene of an Oct. 20 fire-gutted Mount Washington mansion.

The remains may be that of the 84-year-old homeowner thought to have died in the blaze in the 9,100-square foot hillside home in the 4000 block of Sea View Avenue.

His housemates speculated that the man may have gone back inside the burning home in hopes of rescuing several puppies and a cat.

The Los Angeles Fire Department will assist the Los Angeles Police Department and the coroner’s office as needed in the recovery effort and ongoing investigation, said the LAFD’s Brian Humphrey.

In the wake of the blaze, the LAFD, in collaboration with numerous city and county agencies and private crane contractors, “conducted a painstaking and methodical search’’ for human remains, but did not find anything, LAFD spokesman Peter Sanders said last fall.

The flames effectively razed the home, with interior floors collapsing and leaving the structure a smoldering shell of a building.

It took firefighters about three hours to extinguish the flames, but the building continued to smolder. Some neighboring homes also sustained damage from the fire and heat.

A 74-year-old woman was taken to a hospital for treatment of smoke inhalation.

Southwest Museum Named ‘National Treasure’

January 22, 2015 by · 1 Comment 

The city of Los Angeles’100-year-old Southwest Museum was named a “national treasure” today by the National Trust for Historic Preservation. The announcement was made at the museum’s Mount Washington location, making it one of just 55 such designations across the country.

What the designation means for the Southwest Museum in practical terms is not yet clear, however, it will open the door to valuable resources and alliances that could aid in securing the  museum’s future, and most importantly, its long term financial sustainability.

(EGP photo by Jacqueline Garcia)

(EGP photo by Jacqueline Garcia)

 

The National Trust for Historic Preservation — one of the nation’s leading private historic preservation groups — said today it plans to hold public outreach meetings to gather opinions on how best to use the museum site.

The Southwest Museum has been at the center of a near decade long feud between museum supporters and the Autry National Center of the American West, which took over management of the financially failing museum in 2003 as part of a merger agreement.

Southwest supporters say the Autry has not lived up to its “promise” to restore the facility so it could continue to operate as a fully functioning museum.

According to the Autry, they have invested over $14 million since taking over. Two-thirds of the investment has gone to conserving the Southwest’s extensive collection of Native American and early California artifacts and art – which has been removed from the site – and the remainder to renovations to stabilize the museum structure. But they say they cannot afford to operate the museum or pay the estimated $26 to $46 million cost to upgrade the Southwest to modern museum standards.

Friends of the Southwest Museum, a coalition of individuals and organizations that has tried for years to pressure the Autry – and city officials – to reopen the museum, has long contended that the value of the Southwest’s collections could provide a path to securing the revenue needed for operating the historic facility, but that the Autry has been more interested in using the collections to bolster its status and to build patronage of its Griffith Park campus.

The museum has been mostly closed since 2006, only opening for a few hours on Saturdays, to the ire of many museum supporters.

A recent community-based survey showed overwhelming support for a fully functioning museum at the Mt. Washington site, and possibly a cultural community center with some commercial elements, such as a restaurant.

The National Trust says it plans to hold public outreach meetings to gather opinions on how best to use the museum site and its collection.

Barbara Pah, Western Regional VP of the preservation group, said designating the museum site as a national treasure recognizes “the historic, architectural and cultural values that have made the Southwest Museum site a beloved fixture in Los Angeles for the past century.

“With the collaboration and enthusiasm of the Autry, the city of Los Angeles, and individuals and organizations both in the neighborhood and throughout Los Angeles, we look forward to identifying a sustainable use that ensures that the Southwest Museum site actively contributes to the thriving
urban fabric of Los Angeles for the next 100 years,” Pahl said.

Autry president, W. Richard West Jr., said Autry officials are “honored to partner with the National Trust to identify a proud and viable future for the site that will respect its important legacy and bring value to the community and Los Angeles area.”

The National Trust will take the lead on planning and mediating the tense relationship between community stakeholders and the Autry, and could pursue government and private grant funding to support the eventual consensus on the museum’s future.

Councilman Gil Cedillo, who represents the area where the Southwest Museum is located, hailed the National Treasure designation.

“I applaud the National Trust for naming the Southwest Museum, a National Treasure,” stated Cedillo in an email.

The “announcement confirms and validates the importance of preserving our historic resources,” he stated. “I am committed to working with the community and the Autry to help protect and ensure the next 100 years of the Southwest Museum.”

 

4:30 p.m. This article has been updated to note that the “national treasure” designation has been made; National Trust for Historic Preservation’s plans to hold public meetings; quotes and background information from the National Trust and the Autry.

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