Condado Avisa Sobre Peligro de Zancudos

September 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Oficiales sanatorios del Condado de Los Angeles, juntos a la Supervisora Janice Hahn, llegaron puerta-a-puerta el lunes mientras lanzaron una campaña informativa avisando a residentes sobre el virus West Nile y los peligrosos que pueden ser las picaduras de los zancudos.

“Aquí en el Condado de Los Angeles hay zancudos que actualmente llevan el virus West Nile”, dijo Hahn. “Hasta la fecha se han reportado 98 casos de individuos con el virus West Nile y seis muertes confirmados”.

Oficiales Sanatorios notaron que 17 nuevos casos del virus West Nile se dieron en el condado sólo en la última semana, subrayando el peligro vigente de enfermedades portadas por zancudos ¾ las cuales también incluyen al virus Zika.

“Zancudos pueden portar enfermedades graves y hasta mortales, y cada precaución se debe tomar para proteger a su familia y a ti mismo de picaduras”, dijo Hahn.

Hahn y el condado anunciaron la campaña “No es Solo una Picadura” de salud pública, con el objetivo de informar a los residentes sobre la necesidad de protegerse en contra de las picaduras de los zancudos.

Principal entre las recomendaciones es no dejar que la agua se junta afuera porque es ahí donde se reproducen los zancudos. Aún pequeños charcos de agua pueden atraer a los insectos y engendrar peligro para los residentes, dijeron oficiales.

A los residentes también se aconseja ponerse repelente anti-zancudo afuera, notando que la gente de 50 a más años y ellos que padecen de condiciones pre-existentes son las más vulnerables y a riesgo de sufrir daños más graves por el virus West Nile.

Información sobre los virus West Nile y Zika es disponible en el internet por medio del Departamento de Salud Pública del Condado al www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/Mosquito-borne-Disease.htm.

Síntomas del virus West Nile pueden incluir fiebre, dolores, sarpullido, náusea, vómito y dolores de cabeza, pero mucha gente infectada a veces no muestra síntomas cualquieras. Uno de cada150 personas puede ser afectada por síntomas aún más graves como inflamación del cerebro o parálisis, dijeron oficiales sanatorios.

La temporada de zancudos en el sur de California es generalmente desde mayo a octubre, pero oficiales dijeron que la temporada este año se podría extender hasta noviembre.

With 6 Deaths So Far, County Steps Up Mosquito Warnings

September 28, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Los Angeles County health officials, joined by Supervisor Janice Hahn, went door-to-door Monday as they began a public-outreach campaign warning residents about West Nile virus and the dangers of mosquito bites.

“Here in L.A. County there are mosquitoes currently carrying the West Nile virus,” Hahn said. “So far this year there have been 98 cases of individuals with West Nile virus and six confirmed deaths.”

Health officials noted that there were 17 new cases of West Nile virus in the county last week alone, highlighting the continuing danger of mosquito-borne illnesses — which also include the Zika virus.

“Mosquitoes can carry serious and even deadly diseases, and every precaution should be taken to protect yourself and your family from bites,” Hahn said.

Hahn and the county announced the “It’s Not Just a Bite” public health campaign, aimed at spreading the word about the need for residents to protect themselves against mosquito bites.

Paramount among the recommendations is the warning to clear properties of standing water that can become a breeding ground for mosquitoes. Even a small puddle of water can attract the insects and endanger residents, officials said.

Residents were also urged to wear mosquito repellent when outdoors, noting that people over 50 and those with existing health conditions are most at risk of developing serious health issues from West Nile virus.

Information about the West Nile and Zika viruses is available online from the county Department of Public Health at www.publichealth.lacounty.gov/media/Mosquito-Borne-Disease.htm.

Symptoms of West Nile virus can include fever, body aches, rash, nausea, vomiting and headaches, but many people who are infected may not show any symptoms. About one in 150 people could develop more serious problems, such as brain inflammation or paralysis, health officials said.

Mosquito season in Southern California generally spans the months of May to October, but health officials said this year’s season could stretch into November.

East L.A., El Sereno Added to West Nile Target Zone

August 18, 2016 by · 2 Comments 

East Los Angeles and El Sereno are among seven new areas in Los Angeles County where over the past week mosquitos have tested positive for West Nile virus.

According to the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District, West Nile virus activity was also detected for the first time this year in Artesia, Elysian Valley, Hawaiian Gardens, Newhall and Signal Hill.

Vector-control officials warned that the current heat wave could contribute to a spread of the virus.

“This week’s high temperatures are going to increase the risk of West Nile virus infections for many residents,” said Levy Sun, public information officer for the district. “The first line of defense against mosquitoes is to remove all standing water. It’s a simple solution, but it is also easy to
forget.”

Residents who have ongoing problems with mosquitoes were asked to contact the district at (562) 944-9656 or at www.ReportMosquitoes.org.

So far this year, West Nile virus has been detected in 169 mosquito samples in the district’s service area, and in 41 dead birds and five sentinel chickens.

One human case of the virus has been confirmed in Los Angeles County.

Symptoms of West Nile may never materialize, but can include fever, headache, nausea, body aches, skin rashes and swollen lymph nodes.

Mosquitoes typically become carriers of the virus after feeding on an infected bird and can then spread the potentially lethal strain to animals and humans. Residents are urged to contact the district if they spot dead birds in their neighborhood.

To reduce exposure to West Nile virus, residents are urged to limit outdoor activity at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are out in greater numbers; where long sleeves and pants when outdoor and use insect repellant containing DEET; Keep windows and doors closed if they donot have a good screen; and  get rid of standing water — aside from pools properly treated with chemicals — to reduce areas in which mosquitoes may breed, including flower pots and pet bowls.

West Nile Spreading Across L.A. County

August 11, 2016 by · 1 Comment 

West Nile virus is continuing to spread across the Southland, with vector-control officials announcing Monday that the virus was detected for the first time this year in six areas.

According to the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District, West Nile virus activity was recently detected in Carson, La Habra Heights, Lincoln Heights, Newhall, Tarzana and Willowbrook.

District officials said 40 recent mosquito samples tested positive for the virus, which was also confirmed in five sentinel chickens.

So far this year, West Nile virus has been detected in 138 mosquito
samples in the area, and 33 dead birds were confirmed to have the virus.

“West Nile virus is a quiet, buzzing threat in our own backyards,” said Levy Sun of the Vector Control District. “Getting rid of standing water to prevent mosquito breeding is a key to reducing the risk of West Nile virus.”

Los Angeles County health officials last month confirmed the first human case of West Nile virus this year, and a human case was reported in Orange County last week.

Symptoms of West Nile may never materialize, but can include fever, headache, nausea, body aches, skin rashes and swollen lymph nodes.

Mosquitoes typically become carriers of the virus after feeding on an infected bird and can then spread the potentially lethal strain to animals and humans.

To reduce exposure to West Nile virus, residents are urged to:

—limit outdoor activity at dawn or dusk, when mosquitoes are generally on the move;

—wear pants and long-sleeved shirts when outdoors;

—use insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or products containing IR3535;

—ensure door and window screens are in good condition and fitted properly to keep bugs out; and

—get rid of standing water — aside from pools properly treated with chemicals — to reduce areas in which mosquitoes may breed, including flower pots and pet bowls.

First 2015 West Nile Death Reported

July 23, 2015 by · Leave a Comment 

California State health officials Monday reported the first California death of the year caused by the unpredictable West Nile virus. The victim was an elderly resident of Nevada County.

“This death is a tragic reminder of how severe the West Nile virus disease can be. Californians need to be vigilant in protecting themselves,” said state public health director, Dr. Karen Smith.

According to state health officials, thirty-three counties in California have already reported West Nile cases, more than last year at this time. The five-year average of 330 mosquito samples testing positive for the virus has jumped to 497 so far this year.

Health officials are pointing to current climate conditions and lower levels of immunity in birds as contributing factors to this year’s higher numbers. They said the drought has put birds in closer proximity as they search out scarce water supplies.

The risk of serious illness to most people is low. According to public health experts, less than one percent of people bitten will experience the serious neurologic illnesses that can be associated with the virus, such as encephalitis or meningitis.

The state health officials said that people 50 years and older are at higher risk of getting sick and develop complications, so are people with diabetes and/or hypertension.

The California Department of Public Health recommends that residents follow the “Three Ds” to prevent exposure to the West Nile virus:

Deet: Apply insect repellent containing deet, picaradin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or IR3535 according to label instructions, which should keep the mosquitoes from biting human skin.

Dawn and Dusk: Remember that mosquitos are more active during the early morning and evening. Doors and windows should have a tight-fitting screen to keep out mosquitoes.

Drain: Mosquitoes lay their eggs in standing water, so eliminate all sources around the home.

 

Californians are encouraged to report dead birds on the California’s West Nile virus website, www.cdph.ca.gov, or by calling toll-free 1-877-WNV-BIRD (968-2473). 

 

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