Health Officials Warn of West Nile and Zika Carrying Mosquitoes

June 22, 2017 by · Leave a Comment 

Los Angeles County health officials last week confirmed the county’s first human case of West Nile virus for the 2017 season, a revelation followed up on Monday by Long Beach city health officials who announced mosquitoes that can transmit Zika, dengue and other virus have been detected in their city.

Both public health agencies are urging residents to take extra precautions against mosquito bites, noting that mosquito season is at its peak in Southern California between May and October.

The Zika carrying mosquitoes, Aedes aegypti, which have also been found in other areas of Southern California, were detected in North Long Beach in the jurisdiction of the Compton Creek Mosquito Abatement District. Authorities are working to determine the extent of the infestation and prevent their spread. A variety of mosquito traps have been deployed in the area.

“We are actively informing and encouraging residents and visitors to take necessary precautions to prevent mosquito bites,” Mayor Robert Garcia said.

Aedes aegypti is a roughly quarter-inch large, black-and-white insect that is notably aggressive and is known to bite during the daytime.

The patient known to have contracted the West Nile virus was described only as an “elderly” San Gabriel Valley resident who was hospitalized in late March and has since recovered.

According to the state’s West Nile virus-tracking website, only one other human case of West Nile virus has been reported this season in California, in Kings County.

“West Nile is a serious illness spread by mosquitoes in Los Angeles County,” said Dr. Jeffrey Gunzenhauser, the county’s interim health officer.

“Take precautions against mosquito bites such as using a repellant containing DEET when outdoors, especially around dawn or dusk.

“There is currently no vaccine or treatment for West Nile virus,” he said. “Elderly persons and other people with weak immune systems are at highest risk of developing severe illness.”

Symptoms can include fever, body aches, rash, nausea, vomiting and headaches, but many people who are infected may not show any symptoms. About one in 150 people could develop more serious problems, such as brain inflammation or paralysis, health officials said. Zika is especially dangerous to pregnant women, whose Zika virus infection (Zika) during pregnancy can cause damage to the brain, microcephaly, and congenital Zika syndrome, a pattern of conditions in the baby that includes brain abnormalities, eye defects, hearing loss, and limb defects, according to the Center for Disease Control and Prevention website.

To reduce exposure to West Nile, Zika and other viruses, residents are urged to:

— eliminate standing water that can attract mosquitoes;

— spend as little time as possible outdoors at dawn or dusk, when mosquitoes are generally on the move;

— wear pants and long-sleeved shirts during outdoor activity;

— use insect repellent; and

— ensure door and window screens are fitted properly to keep bugs out.

In 2016, Los Angeles County health officials reported 153 human cases and five deaths from West Nile virus. Those statistics do not include the cities of Long Beach and Pasadena, which have their own public health agencies.

 

Encephalitis the Latest Mosquito Danger

August 26, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

As if West Nile virus wasn’t enough, county officials said Wednesday they discovered mosquitoes in Whittier carrying Saint Louis Encephalitis, something that hasn’t been found in the area in seven years.

The last time the SLE virus was detected by the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District was September 2009, when it was found in a wild bird.

Like West Nile, SLE can be transmitted to humans through the bite of an infected mosquito. The two viruses can also cause the same symptoms, such as fever, headache, nausea and fatigue, although most infected people don’t exhibit symptoms.

There is no specific treatment for the virus, according to the district.

The discovery comes as West Nile virus activity continues to increase in the area. According to the vector control district, 26 West Nile-positive mosquito samples were found over the past week, and nine dead birds and three sentinel chickens tested positive for the virus.

West Nile was detected for the first time this year in Huntington Park and Rowland Heights.

“Confirmations of Saint Louis Encephalitis and West Nile virus are reminders that the threat is real in our cities,” according to the district’s Levy Sun. “Thinking `it won’t happen to me’ and ignoring the mosquito risk can be dangerous.”

Breves de la Comunidad

August 18, 2016 by · Leave a Comment 

Highland Park

(CNS)- Los bomberos controlaron un incendio el lunes, 15 de agosto en una de las unidades de un edificio de apartamentos, con estilo de jardín, localizado en el 120 E. de la Avenida 40 en Highland Park.

Un hombre y su hijo fueron evaluados en el lugar de los hechos para determinar si habían sufrido quemaduras, dijo Margaret Stewart, parte del Departamento de Bomberos de Los Ángeles.

Echo Park

(CNS) – Se espera que los oficiales municipales y lideres de la ciudad aprueben recompensas que totalicen a $25,000 con esperanzas de encontrar al sospechoso encargado de una serie de intentos de ataques sexuales y de crímenes de invasión de hogares durante el mes de agosto en las áreas de Echo Park, Westlake, Silver Lake, Hollywood y el centro de Los Ángeles.

La Junta de Supervisores aprobó una recompensa de $10,000 el 17 de agosto gracias a las recomendaciones de la supervisora Hilda Solís. La próxima semana votarán por la medida.

El sospechoso fue descrito como un hombre afroamericano de piel clara, con una edad aproximada de 20 a 30 años y con pelo negro y ojos cafés.

Este de Los Ángeles

(CNS)- Más mosquitos han producido resultados positivos al virus West Nile durante la última semana en diferentes partes de Los Ángeles.

De acuerdo al Distrito de Control de Vectores de Los Ángeles, la actividad relacionada con el virus fue detectada por primera vez en el Este de Los Ángeles, Artesia, El Sereno, Elysian Valley, Hawaiian Gardens, Newhall y Signal Hill.

El Virus “West Nile” ha sido detectado en 169 mosquitos en el distrito y en 41 pájaros muertos y en cinco pollos.

Solamente un caso humano ha sido confirmado por el Condado de Los Ángeles.

Este de Los Ángeles

(CNS) – Se busca a un hombre que se robó $20 de la tienda Mayra’s 99 Cent Discount el miércoles 3 de agosto a las 4:20 p.m. en el bloque 100 de la Avenida Mednick, de acuerdo al Departamento del Sheriff del Condado de Los Ángeles.

La victima, según, vio la punta de una pistola que el hombre cargaba y fue entonces cuando le robó.

El individuo, de unos 20-25 años de edad, llevaba puesto una sudadera y gorra negra, pantalones cortos a la rodilla de color beige con zapatos y calcetines negros.

Si tiene información relevante puede contactar a la estación de policías al (323) 264-4151.

East L.A., El Sereno Added to West Nile Target Zone

August 18, 2016 by · 2 Comments 

East Los Angeles and El Sereno are among seven new areas in Los Angeles County where over the past week mosquitos have tested positive for West Nile virus.

According to the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District, West Nile virus activity was also detected for the first time this year in Artesia, Elysian Valley, Hawaiian Gardens, Newhall and Signal Hill.

Vector-control officials warned that the current heat wave could contribute to a spread of the virus.

“This week’s high temperatures are going to increase the risk of West Nile virus infections for many residents,” said Levy Sun, public information officer for the district. “The first line of defense against mosquitoes is to remove all standing water. It’s a simple solution, but it is also easy to
forget.”

Residents who have ongoing problems with mosquitoes were asked to contact the district at (562) 944-9656 or at www.ReportMosquitoes.org.

So far this year, West Nile virus has been detected in 169 mosquito samples in the district’s service area, and in 41 dead birds and five sentinel chickens.

One human case of the virus has been confirmed in Los Angeles County.

Symptoms of West Nile may never materialize, but can include fever, headache, nausea, body aches, skin rashes and swollen lymph nodes.

Mosquitoes typically become carriers of the virus after feeding on an infected bird and can then spread the potentially lethal strain to animals and humans. Residents are urged to contact the district if they spot dead birds in their neighborhood.

To reduce exposure to West Nile virus, residents are urged to limit outdoor activity at dawn and dusk when mosquitoes are out in greater numbers; where long sleeves and pants when outdoor and use insect repellant containing DEET; Keep windows and doors closed if they donot have a good screen; and  get rid of standing water — aside from pools properly treated with chemicals — to reduce areas in which mosquitoes may breed, including flower pots and pet bowls.

West Nile Spreading Across L.A. County

August 11, 2016 by · 1 Comment 

West Nile virus is continuing to spread across the Southland, with vector-control officials announcing Monday that the virus was detected for the first time this year in six areas.

According to the Greater Los Angeles County Vector Control District, West Nile virus activity was recently detected in Carson, La Habra Heights, Lincoln Heights, Newhall, Tarzana and Willowbrook.

District officials said 40 recent mosquito samples tested positive for the virus, which was also confirmed in five sentinel chickens.

So far this year, West Nile virus has been detected in 138 mosquito
samples in the area, and 33 dead birds were confirmed to have the virus.

“West Nile virus is a quiet, buzzing threat in our own backyards,” said Levy Sun of the Vector Control District. “Getting rid of standing water to prevent mosquito breeding is a key to reducing the risk of West Nile virus.”

Los Angeles County health officials last month confirmed the first human case of West Nile virus this year, and a human case was reported in Orange County last week.

Symptoms of West Nile may never materialize, but can include fever, headache, nausea, body aches, skin rashes and swollen lymph nodes.

Mosquitoes typically become carriers of the virus after feeding on an infected bird and can then spread the potentially lethal strain to animals and humans.

To reduce exposure to West Nile virus, residents are urged to:

—limit outdoor activity at dawn or dusk, when mosquitoes are generally on the move;

—wear pants and long-sleeved shirts when outdoors;

—use insect repellent containing DEET, picaridin, oil of lemon eucalyptus or products containing IR3535;

—ensure door and window screens are in good condition and fitted properly to keep bugs out; and

—get rid of standing water — aside from pools properly treated with chemicals — to reduce areas in which mosquitoes may breed, including flower pots and pet bowls.

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